Ron’s Lit Tip Building Characters

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09 22 2020

Welcome to Ron’s Lit Tip. Every Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday I will share a tip with you.

When writing a story, when do I create characters?

Good question. The short answer is whenever you want. But let’s look at this in more depth.

Importance of Character

Some characters are more important than others. I would suggest you have at least a general idea of who and what the most important characters are before you start writing. The reason is that the primary character(s) will exert influence right from the beginning. Know how your character fits in with the story and having a concept of how things will end for the character will help you in developing your story.

First Occurrence of Primary Character

In most novels the primary character shows up in the first chapter and often on the first page. This is an excellent time to introduce your characters best (or worst) characteristics to the reader. It will shape their opinion of that character from that point onward.

I suggest height, build, hair style and color, skin color, or speech be revealed up front. Skin color tells the reader a great deal, so if you want a little mystery there you would wait to reveal that fact. It is really up to you and depends on how you want your character revealed.

I would suggest you emphasize the primary characteristic. Perhaps the character has a temper, show it. Or perhaps the character tends to listen in on conversations other people are having. Why not show it?

First Occurrence of Other Characters

You don’t need a full biological report here, but it would be helpful if some important characteristic is introduced immediately. It could be he or she had red hair. Or maybe a prominent nose. It could be anything, and it could prove important later on.

Do I need a Record of the Character’s characteristics?

Different authors do different things. Some create a separate document and list the characters by name and what characteristics they have. Some authors do this mentally. I’ve tried both and generally prefer a separate document. Depending on your memory can lead to mistakes, while depending on a document can lead to further developments and even growth of the character(s).

What about using lisps or accents?

If you use lisps, accents, or anything else that is noticeable, then you need to be consistent. In my novel Perished: The World That Was I had the Serpent talk with a lisp. It required consistency or the reader would have noticed it. In the story, Serpent was taken over by Lucifer and the lisp was gone. It helped dramatize the moment.

In another situation I had Methuselah use an identifying phrase. It was something he said that both drew attention to him and to whatever he was emphasizing. It required diligence on my part but it worked.

So, when do I create my characters?

I would suggest you develop your primary and some of your support characters before you start your story. That doesn’t mean include them all at once, but rather to have the capability to include them whenever desired. I also believe, although I don’t always do so, that it is best if you have them in a separate document which becomes a valuable resource.

Tip: Pay attention to your Characters, make a list of their characteristics, and develop them into useful contributors to your story. And prepare them as early as possible.

Get free Guide to Writing at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com.

Subscribe to Author Alerts (click and submit signup form)

For information about us (“we edit, proof, and publish the book within you”)  contact us at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com and get our Free Brochure which tells you about our services.

AUTHOR’S PAGE: amazon.com/author/rfrederickriddle.

ARE YOU A BOOK REVIEWER? Want to review our books? Contact me at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com with the subject line indicating that desire. Such as, ‘Seek to review [book Title].’ Be sure to indicate your email address and your name.

 – – – – – – –

R Frederick Riddle is the Editor of TR Writing Services providing help to struggling and/or new authors to write and publish their books. He is also an author of Historical, Speculative, and Mystery fiction, plus co-founder and Vice President of T&R Independent Books. To reply to any blog you can comment on a blog and/or send an email to marketing@tr-indbkstore.com. His Facebook page is at RFrederickRiddlesWorld. #Writingservices

Ron’s Lit Tip Templates

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09 15 2020

Welcome to Ron’s Lit Tip. Every Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday I will share a tip with you.

What is a template and why should I use one?

That is really two questions, so let’s answer the first one first: What is a template?”

When writing a book, you have a great many little things that have to be done such as Front Matter and Back Matter. Front Matter includes the Title Page, Copyright Page, Dedication Page, Contents, and more. In Back Matter you have the About the Author Page, the Author’s Books Page, and more.

When you write your first book these are items that you had to create from scratch. A template is a barebones setup of your book. It not only can contain the pages listed above it can also have headers and footers in the primary section including the beginning of Paging.

And the Why?

The template saves you money. Since all things are not equal, you need to carefully review your book so that the information is correct. For example, the template may have information that was in a previous book. So, you need to go over it and make corrections.

How?

By going over the new book you just created and examining with care the cover, the Title Page, Copyright Page, and all the pages of your Front Matter. Since this is a new book it likely needs to be changed to reflect the new book. Key words are a good example, as is the Title. And us the same care for the Back Matter.

My Practice

I use templates often. For example, I use the same template within a Series. Saves me a ton of work, but also requires a bit of work to make sure necessary changes have been made. I learned the hard way about meta data. That little known subject is very important for your book.

What is Meta Data?

Think of it as your title, publishing date, key words, and more. Basically anything outside the story itself that is important is meta data. Get that wrong and it will hurt the sales of your book.

What if this is my first book?

Ideal time to set up a template just in case you write more books. When setting up your book you need to set up things like margins, headers, and footers. Begin by dividing your header/footers into sections.

Section One would be your Front Matter with no header or footer information (i.e., title and author name in header and paging in footer); Section Two would be your story which includes your title and author name in the header (Title on odd page, Author name on even page) and paging in the footer; and Section Three would be your Back Matter with no header or footer information.

When done setting up your new book simply copy it and rename it {name} Template. You now have the start of a template. Later you might want to update this, particularly if you have more books and you have a page displaying your books. Also, Front Matter can include the Table of Contents, a map if you want, a Notes from Author page, and more. As you grow as an author you will have additional information that you might want in the Front or Back Matter Sections.

Tip: Use of Templates can lessen your workload.

Get free Guide to Writing at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com.

Subscribe to Author Alerts (click and submit signup form)

For information about us (“we edit, proof, and publish the book within you”)  contact us at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com and get our Free Brochure which tells you about our services.

AUTHOR’S PAGE: amazon.com/author/rfrederickriddle.

ARE YOU A BOOK REVIEWER? Want to review our books? Contact me at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com with the subject line indicating that desire. Such as, ‘Seek to review [book Title].’ Be sure to indicate your email address and your name.

 – – – – – – –

R Frederick Riddle is the Editor of TR Writing Services providing help to struggling and/or new authors to write and publish their books. He is also an author of Historical, Speculative, and Mystery fiction, plus co-founder and Vice President of T&R Independent Books. To reply to any blog you can comment on a blog and/or send an email to marketing@tr-indbkstore.com. His Facebook page is at RFrederickRiddlesWorld. #Writingservices

Ron’s Lit Tip 09 10 20

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Today’s Issue: Proofing

Welcome to Ron’s Lit Tip. Every Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday I will share a tip with you.

What is Proofing?

Google says, “a pre-publication version of your work. The purpose of a proof is so that you can check through everything before your work goes live.”

In other words, it is your last review and edit before publishing. This is a very critical step because some publishers will charge you if you want to make changes after publishing. If you use Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP) that is not a problem. More on that later.

I recommend the following steps for proofing:

  • Proof Copy
  • Cover to Cover
  • Chapter by Chapter
  • Upload
  • Publish
  • Get Published Book
  • Read

Proof Copy

With KDP you pay for the printing costs and shipping. That means it will probably cost lest than $10. The print copy is very important because it’ll look different than what’s on screen.

Cover to Cover

This is recommended so you read the book thoroughly. You will be checking the front cover, title page, copyright, dedication, Table of Contents, Body (actual story), About the Author, Other Books by Author, and back cover, plus other pages. Some experts suggest reading the book from the back to the front, so you don’t let the story distract you.

Upload

I make periodic uploads to KDP and preview on screen. That way I see the appearance of the book with all changes. May not be necessary, but it gives me a feel for how the corrections are going.

Publish

Once you’ve finished editing and if you don’t need to reedit or ask a third party to proof the book, then it is time to publish your work. If you have followed all these steps then your work should be ready for the world.

Get Published Book

Once you are published get at least one copy for yourself. If you are using KDP you can publish your work, discover a mistake then pause the book, edit, and republish. Or you can leave the book live, edit, and republish.

If it is a major rewrite, then you might want to indicate a  new version or re-title. Some publishers may not allow this without a fee.

Read

Sit down, relax, and read it as though it was someone else’s book. If you don’t find any errors, then put it on your bookshelf. If you’re like me, you’ll eventually pick it up and read again. And you might think of new or additional scenes to add. And you can, because you are not only the author, but the publisher as well.

Conclusion

Every writer has their own ideas, but the above should help you get a strong start on your writing career.

Tip: Take Time and Thoroughly Proof Your Book

Get free Guide to Writing at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com.

Subscribe to Author Alerts (click and submit signup form)

For information about us (“we edit, proof, and publish the book within you”)  contact us at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com and get our Free Brochure which tells you about our services.

AUTHOR’S PAGE: amazon.com/author/rfrederickriddle.

ARE YOU A BOOK REVIEWER? Want to review our books? Contact me at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com with the subject line indicating that desire. Such as, ‘Seek to review [book Title].’ Be sure to indicate your email address and your name.

 – – – – – – –

R Frederick Riddle is the Editor of TR Writing Services providing help to struggling and/or new authors to write and publish their books. He is also an author of Historical, Speculative, and Mystery fiction, plus co-founder and Vice President of T&R Independent Books. To reply to any blog you can comment on a blog and/or send an email to marketing@tr-indbkstore.com. His Facebook page is at RFrederickRiddlesWorld. #Writingservices

Ron’s Lit Tip 09 03 20

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Today’s Issue: Inner Thoughts

Welcome to Ron’s Lit Tip. Every Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday I will share a tip with you.

I often advise writers to use italics when allowing readers to ‘hear’ a character’s Inner Thoughts. And I do so again.

But what is so important about Inner Thoughts?

Glad you asked.

Inner Thoughts are the same as thinking. We humans are always thinking and whether or not your characters thinking shows up in a book their actions are the result of and reveal to some extent their thoughts. Sometimes letting the actions depict a character’s thoughts is the best route, but there are times when the reader needs to ‘hear’ those thoughts.

All the Characters?

No. Not even most of the characters. At the very least the reader needs to be able to understand and identify with the primary character. You want the hero or heroine to be as real as possible. This helps the reader identify with the character, maybe sympathize, or even approve of both the thinking and the resulting action.

I’m Still Confused.

You want the primary and maybe a few other leading characters to be real, not two dimensional. Broadcasting the character’s thoughts brings another dimension and can play a pivotal role in the overall story.

Sometimes when a character is facing a problem it can be worked out in thoughts. Instead of you the narrator telling the reader what he or she thought, you allow the character’s thoughts to be heard. The reader gets additional facts right from the character rather than the author.

That can be powerful!

So, why don’t all authors do that?

This may be hard to believe, but it’s possible they disagree with me. It is also possible that they simply never thought of it as being important. Usually such authors endeavor to inform the reader of the thoughts and think that is enough. But consider the following:

Jim’s story wasn’t believed by Detective Adams.

Or

As Jim related his story, Detective Adams thought, There’s something wrong here. This just doesn’t make sense.

You decide which is more powerful.

I see your point, but why the italics?

Technically, there is no law that says you must use italics to indicate thinking. But I contend that if you use quotes (“”) a reader might think the character is talking out loud or if you use an underline (__) a reader my just think it is being emphasized but not really thinking. In both cases the reader may miss the idea of thinking.

Another thing to consider is that in the above example where the detective’s thoughts were shown it got more of the story such as time (as Jim related) and why the detective didn’t believe it (something wrong, and doesn’t make sense). If you were also hearing Jim’s story for the first time, the detective’s thoughts alert you, the reader, to a multitude of possibilities and might cause you to reread Jim’s story.

Oh, in other words, the reader will also wonder.

Yes. And look for clues to solve the mystery. That is just one example of how I believe a character’s thoughts can influence the surrounding scene and, possibly, the entire story.

Tip: Use a primary character’s thoughts to help tell the story.

Tip: Consider using italics to indicate thoughts.

Get free Guide to Writing at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com.

Subscribe to Author Alerts (click and submit signup form)

For information about us (“we edit, proof, and publish the book within you”)  contact us at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com and get our Free Brochure which tells you about our services.

AUTHOR’S PAGE: amazon.com/author/rfrederickriddle.

ARE YOU A BOOK REVIEWER? Want to review our books? Contact me at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com with the subject line indicating that desire. Such as, ‘Seek to review [book Title].’ Be sure to indicate your email address and your name.

 – – – – – – –

R Frederick Riddle is the Editor of TR Writing Services providing help to struggling and/or new authors to write and publish their books. He is also an author of Historical, Speculative, and Mystery fiction, plus co-founder and Vice President of T&R Independent Books. To reply to any blog you can comment on a blog and/or send an email to marketing@tr-indbkstore.com. His Facebook page is at RFrederickRiddlesWorld. #Writingservices

Ron’s Lit Tip 09 02 20

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Today’s Issue: Author Alerts

Welcome to Ron’s Lit Tip. Every Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday I will share a tip with you.

Do you enjoy these blogs?

Would you like more?

Well, I’ve decided to start a newsletter called Author Alerts. At the start I plan on it being a monthly issue, no start date yet. But I have placed a signup (popup) on our website. A visitor to the site sees the popup and, if interested, fills it out and submits. And just like that they are registered.

This is just another way of marketing products and services. Here at T&R Independent Books we have products (books) and services (TR Writing Services). So, it would seem to be an ideal way of marketing. However, our popup is strictly for TR Writing Services.

Marketing products and services is one of the keys to success and it seems to vary from person to person on whether something works. I’ve never used popups before which means this is a new adventure for me.

What am I Using for Email Campaigns

I have learned some things from the sources I use. I have had at least two sources recommend MailerLite for my email campaigns. Another good one is Mail Chimp, but once you get past the free service it gets pricey. So, I chose MailerLite.

My logic is simple. This is an experiment for me, which means I want the best service for the lowest price. If MailerLite is successful I would undoubtedly stick with them for the paid versions. But if I went with Mail Chimp, I would need to swap over to MailerLite once I exceeded Mail Chimps maximum subscriber limits for the free version. Mail Chimp allows up to 2,000 subscribers whereas MailerLite allows up to 1,000 subscribers.

That means when I reach 1,000 subscribers I would need to move to the Paid version. But I am of the persuasion that by that time the email campaign would pay for itself. I have used Mail Chimp in the past but not for long. If my memory serves me right, I found it too hard to navigate and to produce the kind of letters I wanted. In any case, I never did much with it.

What will the Newsletter be like?

For starters, it will be a monthly newsletter. It will be dedicated to writing, publishing, and some marketing. Although I expect the newsletter to grow and expand in its offerings, it will start off with subjects like Tips and Resources, plus other features.

One thing I will also do is gift the PDF version of my book Perished: The World That Was.  It is priced at $9.99, which isn’t a bad price in itself. But Free is always better. It’s a great book and a fine deal.

Tip: Consider using an email service to bolster your reach and your sales.

Get free Guide to Writing at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com.

For information about us (“we edit, proof, and publish the book within you”)  contact us at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com and get our Free Brochure which tells you about our services.

AUTHOR’S PAGE: amazon.com/author/rfrederickriddle.

ARE YOU A BOOK REVIEWER? Want to review our books? Contact me at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com with the subject line indicating that desire. Such as, ‘Seek to review [book Title].’ Be sure to indicate your email address and your name.

 – – – – – – –

R Frederick Riddle is the Editor of TR Writing Services providing help to struggling and/or new authors to write and publish their books. He is also an author of Historical, Speculative, and Mystery fiction, plus co-founder and Vice President of T&R Independent Books. To reply to any blog you can comment on a blog and/or send an email to marketing@tr-indbkstore.com. His Facebook page is at RFrederickRiddlesWorld. #Writingservices

Ron’s Lit Tip I am Motivated, What Next?

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Today’s Issue: I am Motivated, What Next?

Welcome to Ron’s Lit Tip. Every Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday I will share a tip with you.

In the previous blog, I talked about getting motivated and how it’s important. But that’s only the spark.

What’s Next?

Think of a car. First you turn the key on and start the engine. That’s the motivation aspect. Your next step is to shift gears depending on where you want to go.

Shifting Gears.

Start doing something. Notice I didn’t say what to start doing. The reason is simple. Different people have different ways of starting. For example, I use a previous book as a template. This requires a little work because I have to save it under a new title, change key words, and some other metadata. Then of course, I have to remove some interior text. The advantage of this is that most of my frontmatter and backmatter is already there only needing touch ups.

Other people will use other methods. The point is that you have your engine started and it is time to begin your journey. Sitting in the parking lot and idling is not the ‘next’ thing you should be doing.

What’s the Journey?

Well, still using me as an example, I go through the existing text and remove most of it, leaving the Chapter Title, and my standard lines between Chapter Title and Text. Sometimes I go through the whole book first doing this and sometimes I work chapter to chapter, thus beginning the writing process. I will have to change the Title as it appears in the Heading, but that is about all in the text or body.

Another way to do this is to create a template from an existing book and use it over and over. This would already be cleaned up. However, it would also mean more updating of frontmatter and backmatter, as well as changing Heading and paging.

I’ve used both and either one saves time. More importantly it creates a consistency between my books, so when a reader picks up one of my books there is already a sense of familiarity.

But, if you are uncomfortable doing either of those methods, you can start from scratch. This means you will have to create a new title page, copyright page, and other frontmatter, plus the text including heading, and page numbers. Plus, you will need to add your backmatter, such as Author page, listing of previous books written, and more.

Lit Tip: Consider making a Template before you write.

Get free Guide to Writing at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com.

For information about us (“we edit, proof, and publish the book within you”)  contact us at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com and get our Free Brochure which tells you about our services.

AUTHOR’S PAGE: amazon.com/author/rfrederickriddle.

ARE YOU A BOOK REVIEWER? Want to review our books? Contact me at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com with the subject line indicating that desire. Such as, ‘Seek to review [book Title].’ Be sure to indicate your email address and your name.

 – – – – – – –

R Frederick Riddle is the Editor of TR Writing Services providing help to struggling and/or new authors to write and publish their books. He is also an author of Historical, Speculative, and Mystery fiction, plus co-founder and Vice President of T&R Independent Books. To reply to any blog you can comment on a blog and/or send an email to marketing@tr-indbkstore.com. His Facebook page is at RFrederickRiddlesWorld. #Writingservices

Ron’s Lit Tip Motivation

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Today’s Issue: Motivation

Welcome to #RonsLitTip. Every Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday I will share a tip with you.

What is Motivation?

The dictionary defines it as ‘1 – The act of motivating or providing an incentive; 2 – That which motivates; incentive, drive’.

Simply put, it is doing something that encourages you to move forward toward your goal. It can be an incentive, a reward, an inspirational phrase, almost anything.

How do you get Motivated?

Getting motivated is a lot harder than merely quoting a dictionary. It requires a little self-introspection. For example, I am motivated to write this blog because I want to help other people. I write books and my motivation there is both to entertain and to share the Christian worldview and the Gospel. I am the Editor at TR Writing Services because I want to help new authors and other authors get their hard work turned into a quality book and then get published.

Three different tasks and three different motivations: Help others, entertain, and be a witness.

We are each different from one another. And that applies to motivation. Some people are motivated to write by the promise of money, fame, and influence. It can be just one or, as in my case, multiple goals. You need to find what motivates you. To do that you need to ask yourself hard questions and answer honestly.

These questions can be as simple as: What do I want to achieve with this book? Sales, popularity, influence, or something else. Write it down. Then break it down.

For instance, one of my choices would be influence. I could break that down to Help others and to acquaint them with Christ. Or I might choose to entertain and break that down to providing a good read, igniting their imagination, or providing escape from everyday life.

How to Keep Motivated?

Once you’ve identified what motivates you, I believe the rest is easy. Keep doing the things that got you motivated in the first place. But, while that is true, there is a dark side.

Getting Motivated Again

The fact is that experienced writers do get off track. I’m tempted to say go back to How do you get Motivated and start over. And that might work. The problem is that sometimes when we get off track, we also lose the desire to get motivated. Sometimes we need a kick in the pants by our friends or relatives. Only when you regain the desire to be motivated will the Get Motivated work.

You need someone who is willing to do that. It can be your mate, a friend, or a fellow author. By the way, this works in your Christian walk also.

Lit Tip: Motivation is important. Keep working on it.

Get free Guide to Writing at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com.

For information about us (“we edit, proof, and publish the book within you”)  contact us at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com and get our Free Brochure which tells you about our services.

AUTHOR’S PAGE: amazon.com/author/rfrederickriddle.

ARE YOU A BOOK REVIEWER? Want to review our books? Contact me at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com with the subject line indicating that desire. Such as, ‘Seek to review [book Title].’ Be sure to indicate your email address and your name.

 – – – – – – –

R Frederick Riddle is the Editor of TR Writing Services providing help to struggling and/or new authors to write and publish their books. He is also an author of Historical, Speculative, and Mystery fiction, plus co-founder and Vice President of T&R Independent Books. To reply to any blog you can comment on a blog and/or send an email to marketing@tr-indbkstore.com. His Facebook page is at RFrederickRiddlesWorld.

Ron’s Lit Tip Rewrite

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Today’s Issue: Rewrite

Ron’s Lit Tip. Every Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday I will share a tip with you.

Should we ever consider rewriting our book?

Yes!

Maybe it’s me but I enjoy rereading books I’ve written. Not because I’m vain, but because I enjoy the same genre’s that I write in. I read other authors works as well, but on occasion I read what I’ve written. I love to read.

In the process of reading my books I sometimes think that something should have been written differently or maybe expanded upon. On occasion I may find an error. But the biggest thing is I am inspired to make changes that, in my opinion, strengthens the book.

And then there is the feeling of freshness. Unless your book is a masterpiece it probably needs refreshing from time to time. And a refreshed book might stir sales, as well.

Isn’t that hard?”

Not as hard as you might expect. If you are an Indie Author and Publisher, you probably have that ability. You do if you use KDP. That is one of the reasons I love being an Indie. Once I have written a book I can go back and edit it anytime I want.

How do you do it?”

There are two ways to do it.

Number 1: write your revised version while the original is still for sale. You should do this if the changes are only cosmetic. For example, you found some errors after the book was published and you want to correct/remove them. Simply edit the book then republish.

Number 2: suspend the book and rewrite it when you have major changes that impact the entire story. When done, republish. You might want to consider this if the book has major mistakes or you want to do a total rewrite. However, if a total rewrite, then it might require a new ISBN. In addition, you might want to change the cover. If you want to change the Title or the ISBN, that will mean you are publishing a new book.

Then What?

Once you decide to revise it, began going through your book and making the corrections, deletions, and/or additions. Next, revisit editing the book. Be just as thorough as you originally were.

Will that mean changing the price?

KDP allows you to change your price at any time. You can raise, lower, or leave as is the pricing.

What else should I change?

You have the option of changing the book cover, but not the title or ISBN (see above). If you are doing a complete overhaul you can then create a new book with a new ISBN.

Any final thoughts?

Don’t be afraid to edit or revise. It is a powerful tool that you can use to improve the writing and the sales.

Lit Tip: Once your book has been published, review and, if needed, rewrite (edit).

Get free Guide to Writing at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com.

For information about us (“we edit, proof, and publish the book within you”)  contact us at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com and get our Free Brochure which tells you about our services.

AUTHOR’S PAGE: amazon.com/author/rfrederickriddle.

ARE YOU A BOOK REVIEWER? Want to review our books? Contact me at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com with the subject line indicating that desire. Such as, ‘Seek to review [book Title].’ Be sure to indicate your email address and your name.

 – – – – – – –

R Frederick Riddle is the Editor of TR Writing Services providing help to struggling and/or new authors to write and publish their books. He is also an author of Historical, Speculative, and Mystery fiction, plus co-founder and Vice President of T&R Independent Books. To reply to any blog you can comment on a blog and/or send an email to marketing@tr-indbkstore.com. His Facebook page is at RFrederickRiddlesWorld.

Ron’s Lit Tip First Person

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Ron’s Tip of the Day is now Ron’s Lit Tip. Every Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday I will share a tip with you. Today I am looking at First Person.

I am not a fan of First Person.

Having said that, I have read stories in the First Person and thoroughly enjoyed them. A contradiction?

Yes. I generally stay away from First Person books, but that attitude is not absolute. Sometimes a story will attract me, and I will read it despite being first person. My biggest objection to the writing not the reading is it a very difficult medium to work within, so I avoid it.

But if you can write an entertaining story in first person, give it a shot. Chances are I might come across it, decide to read it and enjoy it.

What is First Person?

The dictionary gives us the following descriptions: The speaker (First Person), the person being talked to (Second Person), and the person being talked about (Third Person). Another way to look at it is the following: I, me, (First Person); you, (Second Person), and he, him, (Third Person).

Most authors use the third person.

One reason I enjoy Third Person is its flexibility. First Person is rigid, in my opinion, and the author only knows what the person knows. In Third Person the author knows more than the main character and has more control. Another reason I don’t like First Person is it can come across too prideful. It takes skill to make it work.

Maybe you have the skill to make it work for you. Then give it a try.

Lit Tip: If you have the skill then try using First Person.

Get free Guide to Writing at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com.

For information about us (“we edit, proof, and publish the book within you”)  contact us at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com and get our Free Brochure which tells you about our services.

AUTHOR’S PAGE: amazon.com/author/rfrederickriddle.

ARE YOU A BOOK REVIEWER? Want to review our books? Contact me at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com with the subject line indicating that desire. Such as, ‘Seek to review [book Title].’ Be sure to indicate your email address and your name.

 – – – – – – –

R Frederick Riddle is the Editor of TR Writing Services providing help to struggling and/or new authors to write and publish their books. He is also an author of Historical, Speculative, and Mystery fiction, plus co-founder and Vice President of T&R Independent Books. To reply to any blog you can comment on a blog and/or send an email to marketing@tr-indbkstore.com. His Facebook page is at RFrederickRiddlesWorld.

Ron’s Lit Tip Word Overuse

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Ron’s Tip of the Day is now Ron’s Lit Tip. Every Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday I will share a tip with you. Today I am looking at Word Overuse.

Take a look at these words ‘then’, ‘beautiful’, ‘sunny’, ‘happy’, and any other word you can think of. They all have the potential to be overused.

What do you mean?

I am talking about repeatably using the same word over and over. When you find yourself doing that it might be a good idea to find a synonym. It means the same but is not the same word. Repetition is not always complimentary. Sometimes it becomes a drag on the story and may attract undo attention from the reader.

Using synonyms can also freshen your story and make everything more enjoyable to read. It good to look for other ways of describing the same action, reaction, or whatever else you are writing about.

This is also true of antonyms, which are words with opposite meanings. But it is synonyms you will use more often. They broaden your word usage and make your book that much more effective.

What’s the danger of overusing words?

I’ve already referred to it. It becomes a drag. It loses its freshness and makes the story stale and boring. So, it is a good thing to keep an eye out for repetition and changeup if possible. Perhaps get yourself a thesaurus for a resource.

But be careful. Some words might be synonyms but have slightly different applications. So, when replacing one word with another make sure to reword the sentence or paragraph. You don’t want to lose the meaning. You’ll also want to be aware of the tense. It could be finite, past, present, or future.

Lit Tip: Learn to use synonyms properly.

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R Frederick Riddle is the Editor of TR Writing Services providing help to struggling and/or new authors to write and publish their books. He is also an author of Historical, Speculative, and Mystery fiction, plus co-founder and Vice President of T&R Independent Books. To reply to any blog you can comment on a blog and/or send an email to marketing@tr-indbkstore.com. His Facebook page is at RFrederickRiddlesWorld.