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Understanding the Importance of Reviews

What is the importance of Reviews? Well, it just might make the difference in how the reader views your book. And whether a purchase takes place.

In my last blog I spoke about a very nice review I received, and I mentioned Booksprout. There seems to be a growing number of review services coming online these days. I have checked out others, and most seem to want to swap reviews.

As far as I know, that is fine as long as you are not swapping type of book review, as in ‘I will review and give your book 5 stars if you will do the same for me’. That would be wrong. But making yourself available to do reviews in exchange for someone else reviewing your book does not violate any rules that I know of. The key is there is no direct link from your doing a review to you receiving a review.

That said, I like Booksprout’s approach. With them I have choices: Free to up to 20 reviews per book; $10 per month for up to 50 reviews per book; and $20 per month for unlimited reviews.

It is easy, cost effective, and it works.

But are book reviews still important?

More about this on the other side of this break.

TR-WritingServices.com brings you this blog post or podcast to keep you informed on the issues of today. Authors need to stay informed so that they can relate to their readers facts as well as entertain them with their imagination.

 TR-WritingServices.com is a service dedicated to help authors reach their potential as independent writers. Knowing the world you live in and work in is essential to being a good writer, thus the need for the free flow of information.

To discover how we can help you be the writer you want to be, write to us at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com. We will respond with a free copy of our Guide to Writing plus a brochure detailing our plans. We won’t ask for your credit card or any money, but we will send you these items for free.

Check us out and get your career moving.

Now back to the article.

I asked if reviews were still important. In a recent book I was reviewing the author had this to say, ‘any author’s marketing strategy should include the pursuit of reviews…[and] a good number of them’.

Reviews are important. Even bad reviews can be good for you. On a previous book I wrote and published I received a 2-star review. The reviewer didn’t like the book and was highly critical of it and me (the author). I could have deleted it, but I left it up.

Why?

Because it was obvious from the review that he didn’t follow reviewing rules. He skipped around and, in the end, he never finished the book. How do I know? He said so in his review (at least he was honest). But I was getting 4-star and 5-star reviews from others. So, it made a dramatic contrast.

If he had read the book through, the negative statements and/or observations he made would not have been named. In other words, the problems he cited were of his own making! He was careless, should have known better, and ended up writing a review that even a novice could see was wrong.

So, here is a review principle you might use: If you get a negative review while you are also getting positive reviews, consider keeping it on the list. Not on the top, but further down so that potential readers will already have read positive reviews before getting to that solitary bad review. There is a way to do this, but that isn’t the topic today.

Back at that time I had a different website and I posted reviews of my books on that site. It was a good practice that I got away from when I shifted to another website, but now I am returning to that practice.

In building my new website, which is using a storefront theme, I forgot about providing reviews. And in the process of time, I have lost some reviews when changing computers, but others I have now posted to the site. And I will be pursuing reviews more aggressively in the future.

Perhaps, you ask why I am returning? Because it enables readers to check out the reviews of any books they are considering. It shows the readers that I am honest by providing the negative review, but it also shows that the reviewer was quite likely off-base. (If you look for the negative review, I haven’t found it yet; it may be lost.)

Now, if there are a great many negative reviews, you might want to consider a different response. Read the reviews thoughtfully. Do they all harp on the same errors? If so, then maybe you should unpublish the book, fix the errors and then republish. If it is a major change you might need to retitle it as a new work and then seek new reviews.

I did receive another negative review, although it was more of a communication that a true review. In that review, the writer liked the book but felt some of my facts were wrong. Some of the criticism was off, in my opinion. But some of it made me take a closer look. The end result was an almost complete rewrite. So, I retitled the book and republished it. I tried contacting the man, but he never responded. But that was a case of a bad review influencing me to write a better book.

So, if you are doing a review, where do you post it?

The answer usually is Amazon. However, Amazon is making it harder to post reviews. For example, I don’t buy a lot off of Amazon within any given year. Over time, maybe. But not within a year. While I sell on Amazon, I usually like to go into a bookstore and ‘handle’ a book that I am thinking of buying.

But Amazon has installed a requirement that you have to purchase $50 or more from them in a year’s time to be able to post a review. It is unfortunate, but Booksprout for instance lets the reviewer post their review to Bookbub and Goodreads, as well as Amazon.

Reviews are a good way to influence sales. Finding a good reviewer is a little different and I may visit that subject in the future. One source of finding reviewers is kindleprenuer. But even such listings there need to be approached carefully. You want someone who works in your genre to begin with. Check them out. And definitely check out Booksprout. I have only limited experience with them, so I can’t say positively that they are the answer. Only you can answer that question.

All three formats of World of Joseph are available at Amazon. But the paperback and hardcover are available at TR Independent Bookstore where all our books are always discounted. Now that the special discount of World of Joseph of 20% ended at midnight of the 19th, both formats are still discounted the same as all our books. So, you still have great bargains!

Speaking of reviews, why not review one of my books. Next month I plan on submitting more books to be reviewed on Booksprout, but you don’t have to wait. If you buy one of our books from Amazon, you can post a review. Or you can try Goodreads where I am listed as R. Riddle.

We are proud to be able to offer you the best possible experience at TR Independent Bookstore. Whether you are living in Southwest Florida or elsewhere in the United States, we want to be your local bookstore. We are located on the internet at tr-writingservices.com. Drop in and check us out.

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World of Joseph

By now anyone who follows me knows I have published a new novel titled World of Joseph. It is subtitled, Mentuhotep Vizier of Egypt.

It has been a busy time since I published it around 5:20 am on Thursday, the 12th. I almost forgot to do this blog. If you see a string of ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ that means I fell asleep. Please don’t disturb me.

Writing the series The World That Was has been an exciting journey. The first book of the journey was Perished: The World That Was. Since then I have written and published World of Noah and the Ark, World of Shem, World of Abraham, World of Jacob, and now World of Joseph.

You may also note that this is the first time I have offered an eBook, Paperback, and hardcover. I hope to do more of the same with future books.

My next series is Moses, Friend of God. This will be divided into four books, Moses Prince of Egypt, Moses Exiled, Moses Deliverer, and Moses Wanderings. Each book will cover 40 years of his life. I am looking forward to it.

I am also planning a new series called The Truth About. This may at times be inspirational as well as informational, but will be nonfiction.

But right after the break I will talk more about the World of Joseph.

More about this on the other side of this break.

TR-WritingServices.com brings you this blog post or podcast to keep you informed on the issues of today. Authors need to stay informed so that they can relate to their readers facts as well as entertain them with their imagination.

 TR-WritingServices.com is a service dedicated to help authors reach their potential as independent writers. Knowing the world you live in and work in is essential to being a good writer, thus the need for the free flow of information.

To discover how we can help you be the writer you want to be, write to us at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com. We will respond with a free copy of our Guide to Writing plus a brochure detailing our plans. We won’t ask for your credit card or any money, but we will send you these items for free.

Check us out and get your career moving.

Now back to the article.

I have mentioned this previously, but it is proper to mention it again. Until recent decades, Egyptian chronology was a mess. In writing previous books in the series, The World That Was, I had a tremendous amount of difficulty bringing Egyptian history into any semblance of agreement with known history.

Known history means history as reported in the Bible along with any secular history available. I could find reliable history of other nations, but the country of Egypt was an enigma.

Why?

If you know anything about Egypt, you know that the Nile River shaped their story. It is also one of the few rivers in the world that flows from the south to the north, which explains why the Egyptians called southern Egypt Upper and northern Egypt Lower. Southern Egypt would have been higher geographically, and the river flowed downward toward the north and emptied into the Mediterranean Sea.

Beginning with two brothers there were two dynasties established at the same time. One brother ruled Upper Egypt and the other brother ruled Lower Egypt. It wasn’t until the 12th Dynasty that the country was truly united into one Egypt. This union began under Pharaoh Amenemhet I, who founded the 12th Dynasty. Actually, the 11th Dynasty may have begun this, but it was Amenemhet I who accomplished it. His son, Sesostris I, was the Pharaoh under whom Mentuhotep served.

Not critical to the Bible, we don’t really know about this unification, nor about Joseph’s role other than the feeding of the people and centralizing of the government. So, you have a hint there, but it was until the chronology of Egypt was straightened out that such facts began to emerge.

One other interesting fact about Mentuhotep. In ancient Egypt the people worshipped the pharaohs and made statues of them. Part of the confusion in identifying Mentuhotep was the fact statues of him were found. This led researchers to believe he was a Pharaoh. But rather than showing his as a pharaoh, the statues were made because he was highly regarded and almost like a pharaoh to the Egyptian people. It fits right in with the Biblical account.

Egypt and Israel have had an interesting relationship over thousands of years going back to the ancient days when Abraham, Jacob, and Joseph lived. Sometimes the countries have been allies, sometimes enemies, but God has used Egypt and, if I read the Bible right, will use Egypt again. These days, Egypt and Israel while not friends, certainly are on good terms.

And don’t forget, when Jesus was a baby, his father and mother moved to Egypt to be protected from King Herod. A very interesting relationship, and the story of Joseph/Mentuhotep is part of that relationship.

The preorder of the eBook closed August 12th and now all three formats are available at Amazon. But the paperback and hardcover are available at TR Independent Bookstore where all our books are always discounted. The World of Joseph has a special discount of 20% only at our store.

We are proud to be able to offer you the best possible experience at TR Independent Bookstore. Whether you are living in Southwest Florida or elsewhere in the United States, we want to be your local bookstore. We are located on the internet at tr-writingservices.com. Drop in and check us out.

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Researching Egypt

Researching Egypt may sound odd for a blog title, but it isn’t as odd as you might think. I have often talked about doing your research. Well, I have been writing a book that is nearing completion. It is the World of Joseph, subtitled Mentuhotep Vizier of Egypt. Guess what, it takes place primarily in Egypt!

So, it required research. The subtitle itself is a product of this research. Before I started, I didn’t know Joseph’s Egyptian name other than the one given him by Pharaoh. But research showed that the name Mentuhotep was the name that history identified with him. The many and conflicting names of pharaohs and their viziers was just one of the issues I had to deal with when doing research.

Fortunately, I didn’t have to do the work all by myself. I am not an expert Egyptologist. But through the internet I was able to gather a great deal of information about the Pharaoh, Sesostris I, along with the Vizier Mentuhotep, and the capital of Egypt, which was Itjtawy pronounced Ish ta way. Through research I was able to find the possible location of this mysterious city, design the palace which resembled other Egyptian palaces, and locate the land of Goshen.

More about this issue on the other side of this break.

TR-WritingServices.com brings you this blog post or podcast to keep you informed on the issues of today. Authors need to stay informed so that they can relate to their readers facts as well as entertain them with their imagination.

 TR-WritingServices.com is a service dedicated to help authors reach their potential as independent writers. Knowing the world you live and work in is essential to being a good writer, thus the need for the free flow of information.

To discover how we can help you be the writer you want to be, write to us at markting@tr-indbkstore.com. We will respond with a free copy of our Guide to Writing plus a brochure detailing our plans. We won’t ask for your credit card or any money, but we will send you these items for free.

Check us out and get your career moving.

Now back to the article.

Tracking down Joseph in Egyptian history was quite a struggle. Not for me, but for Egyptologists. To begin with, Egyptian dynasties had to be discovered. Using ancient records proved daunting and made for a very unreliable Egyptian timeline, which not only didn’t compare with the Bible but didn’t compare with other well-known facts.

Fortunately, Egyptologists were able to make additional discoveries that led to a new Egyptian timeline. Although not intended, this new timeline merged well with the Biblical timeline.

But another aspect in tracking down Joseph was that Egyptians either did not know Joseph as Joseph or they chose not to use that name. It was a Hebrew name and therefore unlikely to be used by them. What the researchers did is research the Biblical facts regarding the feast and famine. Combining this knowledge with the knowledge they now had of where the Hebrews settled, the researchers were able to zoom in on the 12th Dynasty or Middle Kingdom. And when they did, they discovered that Mentuhotep was likely the Vizier we know as Joseph.

This vizier under Sesostris I was the second most powerful person in the government. He is credited with many things, chiefly the survival of Egypt during a seven-year famine! And not just that, he played a significant role in helping to establish the 12th Dynasty.

So, the truth is that others did the research, and I reaped the benefits! Not only did I now have a reliable history from which to work, I was now able to dive into the 12th Dynasty and discover much information, some of which found its way into my novel.

This is an example of what it takes to create a believable story. It is also an example of how you, the author, should handle the need for information. Whenever possible, let others do the heavy lifting of research. Eventually you have to get involved, but it is a major aid if you let others do the work for you.

And there is a big reward for you when the book is finished. First of all, you get a very special feeling of accomplishing something. While the novel is fictional, when the facts are examined, the book not only comes alive, but the reader gains insight. Moreover, the reader comes away with a greater understanding of the times and the people. And you have written something that has value.

If you are reading this blog or listening to this podcast, it is being brought to you by T&R Independent Bookstore. We want to be your local bookstore and we are located on the internet at tr-writingservices.com. Drop in and check us out.

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Ron’s Lit Tip What to Write

10 06 2020

Welcome to Ron’s Lit Tip. Every Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday I will share a tip with you.

Finding subjects to write on can be difficult or easy depending on your approach. Experts advise that you find what is popular and write accordingly. I suppose that works if all you are interested in is sales. But if you want to write something good, write upon subjects you find interesting.

For example, I love history, so my favorite genre is Historical Fiction. In that genre I’ve written about Bible based history, which are historical events that are seen from a biblical view. When you use the book of Genesis you get history often written by eyewitnesses.  Out of this genre has come my The World That Was series.

Another genre I enjoy is Speculative Fiction. This and Science Fiction are like kissing cousins. Very much alike, but yet different. I usually explain this way, Speculative Fiction is Science Fiction without little green men. Often Speculative Fiction deals with future events, sometimes events recorded in the Book of Revelation. In one sense this is Historical Fiction in that it is history prewritten. The famous Left Behind series would fit in this genre.

My point is that I write what I enjoy.

Another genre I enjoy reading is Mystery. And that will soon produce Mystery novels. So, I have a question: Are you writing what you enjoy or just what someone else enjoys?

I may get negative feedback on this but writing only what others like may be financially profitable, but it is likely going to be less than your best work. Ideally, you want to write books that sell and that you like! This combination should bring out your best writing and sell.

I do not know of any guaranteed method that will meet that standard. As a general rule I would say first write down possible stories and then search the internet for the most popular genres out there. But just because no one else hasn’t written what you plan to write doesn’t mean your book shouldn’t be written.

On the other hand, don’t be afraid to write in an unfamiliar genre. Study it, learn some basics, and give it a try. Who knows, you might just find something new that you like to write.

Tip: Don’t let $$$ determine what you write.

Tip: Don’t be afraid to write in a popular, yet unfamiliar genre.

Get free Guide to Writing at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com.

Subscribe to Author Alerts (click and submit signup form)

For information about us (“we edit, proof, and publish the book within you”)  contact us at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com and get our Free Brochure which tells you about our services.

AUTHOR’S PAGE: amazon.com/author/rfrederickriddle.

ARE YOU A BOOK REVIEWER? Want to review our books? Contact me at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com with the subject line indicating that desire. Such as, ‘Seek to review [book Title].’ Be sure to indicate your email address and your name.

 – – – – – – –

R Frederick Riddle is the Editor of TR Writing Services providing help to struggling and/or new authors to write and publish their books. He is also an author of Historical, Speculative, and Mystery fiction, plus co-founder and Vice President of T&R Independent Books. To reply to any blog you can comment on a blog and/or send an email to marketing@tr-indbkstore.com. His Facebook page is at RFrederickRiddlesWorld. #Writingservices

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Ron’s Lit Tip Writer’s Growth

10 01 2020

Welcome to Ron’s Lit Tip. Every Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday I will share a tip with you.

Are you a beginning writer?

Have you written your first book?

Have you written several books?

If you can answer yes to any of the above questions, then you have something in common with most writers: You need to grow, to improve.

What’s wrong with my writing?

I didn’t say anything was wrong. A better question would be: How do I grow as a writer?

OK, how do I grow?

Think about muscles. If you work out with weights and other exercise equipment there is a likelihood that you are going to get stronger. And if you don’t work out there is an equal chance you will get weaker. Muscles need exercise. Well, think of your writing. The skills you have developed are like muscles. Just like muscles need to be exercised, your writing muscles need to be used.

But Growth also needs Food.

Just as your body and your muscles need vitamins and other nutrients, you as an author also need something. That something can be many things, such as learning new skills, shedding mistakes that hold you back, maybe adding a genre to the one you already have, and many more.

Genre?

Yes. Each genre has its own unique characteristics. For example, my first genre was Historical Fiction. I wrote books that took place in history. My series The World That Was is based on history that took place in biblical times. But my novel Dead Eye Will took place in American History. These are sub-genres under Historical Fiction. So, even adding a sub-genre to your resume can add to your overall appeal and, more importantly, to your skill set.

But adding an altogether different genre will definitely sharpen your skills and add new ones. I told you above that I wrote, and still write, Historical Fiction. I love history and that was a natural for me. But I also enjoy science fiction, so I decided to try writing Science Fiction, although what I write is more appropriately called Speculative Fiction. (I explain the difference as Speculative Fiction being Science Fiction without little green men. It is futuristic, can take place in space, here on Earth, and never involve aliens.)

Two Different Genres Require Two Different Skill Sets.

Some skills transfer to any genre, but writing historical novels requires a knowledge of history and the placement of the novel within the selected historical times. On the other hand, speculative novels require a knowledge of science, whether space science or future science that may impact our daily lives. Since it is generally futuristic you are writing history in advance. This resulted in my Christland series.

If that wasn’t enough, I have become interested in Mystery, a totally different genre. I am currently working on a mystery that involves murder and science set in the future.

These three genres are different from one another and demand different skills from me. Some I know, others I am learning. And that is what I mean by growing. I am adding new skill sets to what I already had and using new tools to do it. These represent multiple genres.

Tip: To grow, add to yourself new skills, tools, and maybe genres.

Get free Guide to Writing at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com.

Subscribe to Author Alerts (click and submit signup form)

For information about us (“we edit, proof, and publish the book within you”)  contact us at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com and get our Free Brochure which tells you about our services.

AUTHOR’S PAGE: amazon.com/author/rfrederickriddle.

ARE YOU A BOOK REVIEWER? Want to review our books? Contact me at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com with the subject line indicating that desire. Such as, ‘Seek to review [book Title].’ Be sure to indicate your email address and your name.

 – – – – – – –

R Frederick Riddle is the Editor of TR Writing Services providing help to struggling and/or new authors to write and publish their books. He is also an author of Historical, Speculative, and Mystery fiction, plus co-founder and Vice President of T&R Independent Books. To reply to any blog you can comment on a blog and/or send an email to marketing@tr-indbkstore.com. His Facebook page is at RFrederickRiddlesWorld. #Writingservices

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Ron’s Tip of the Day Mystery

Welcome to Ron’s Tip of the Day. Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays I will share a tip with you. Today I am looking at Mystery.

To clarify I am not talking about the genre mystery.

That is somewhat related, but I am talking about all books need a little mystery. And I am not necessarily talking about who killed who. Rather, I am talking about mystery surrounding a character or place or event.

Could you explain that?

Yes. I believe that authors today tell the readers too much. I’ve mentioned it before, but the reader’s imagination is a tool that we should use more often.

For example, instead of saying, Jim was in love, why not show it? Perhaps he decides to send Alice a bouquet of flowers. The word ‘love’ doesn’t have to appear because the action displays it. The beauty of this approach is that you the writer can convey the fact Jim is in love with Alice by describing how meticulous he is in selecting just the right flowers.

Another example could be instead of saying Tom can’t swim, you write a scene where Tom is in the water desperately trying to stay afloat. He experiences panic, swallows’ water, and is alone in the sea.

The idea is to let the story or character convey the action rather than you the author telling the reader what happens.

Does that mean I don’t describe anything?

No. You want to strike for balance. Sometimes prose is needful, sometimes letting the character experience the action or view is better. You as the author make that choice. Hopefully, your character or the story itself will naturally communicate which is better and when.

Where is the Mystery?

When the character doesn’t know what is going to happen next, your readers shouldn’t know either, in most cases. You don’t need the reader to know the future unless that is important to your story. A little mystery can add to the reader’s expectations.

Tip of the Day: Add mystery by not telling all.

Get free Guide to Writing at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com.

For information about us (“we edit, proof, and publish the book within you”)  contact us at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com and get our Free Brochure which tells you about our services.

AUTHOR’S PAGE: amazon.com/author/rfrederickriddle.

ARE YOU A BOOK REVIEWER? Want to review our books? Contact me at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com with the subject line indicating that desire. Such as, ‘Seek to review [book Title].’ Be sure to indicate your email address and your name.

 – – – – – – –

R Frederick Riddle is the Editor of TR Writing Services providing help to struggling and/or new authors to write and publish their books. He is also an author of Historical, Speculative, and Mystery fiction, plus co-founder and Vice President of T&R Independent Books. To reply to any blog you can comment on a blog and/or send an email to marketing@tr-indbkstore.com. His Facebook page is at RFrederickRiddlesWorld.

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Ron’s Tip of the Day Want to Write Biblical Novels?

Welcome to Ron’s Tip of the Day. Throughout the week I will share a tip with you. Today I am looking at Want to Write Biblical Novels?

Writing a Bible-based novel can be successful or risky. But if you use these simple guidelines you should be able to appeal to a large audience.

  • Always assume the Bible is correct

You get messed up if you accept the popular myth that modern science knows better. Science can shed light upon the Bible, but it can never contradict the Bible.

  • Do Your Diligent Research

Use the Bible as a filter, a spotlight or research. When you find a new ‘fact’ shine the spotlight upon it. In my novels I studied the clothing, foods, weapons,and more of that era.

  • Work the Biblical Text into the Story

Sometimes take a direct quote of one or more verses and make them part of the story. Mix the Bible and modern English together so the characters speak using both interchangeably.

  • Use Bible Characters

This is unavoidable but good. If your reader is familiar with the Bible, there will be a common connection between your novel and the Bible.

  • Try avoiding conflicting characters

But the Bible may have more than one character with the same name. This creates a difficulty especially for readers who skip (one reviewer skipped and claimed I was inconsistent with my characters).

  • Use only one Bible version

You can use other versions to increase your own understanding, but only use one in the book. Otherwise you run the risk of confusing your reader. I use only KJV because I believe it is the only accurate version.

  • Don’t Be Preachy

That doesn’t mean no gospel nor no sermons or other Christian statements. It means not being overbearing. The gospel, sermons, etc., should all fit within your story seamlessly!

Tip of the Day: Use above guidelines.

Get our free Guide to Writing by contacting us at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com. We will send you our Free Brochure which tells you about our services.

For information on TR Writing Services (“we edit, proof, and publish the book within you”)  contact us at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com.

AUTHOR’S PAGE: amazon.com/author/rfrederickriddle.

ARE YOU A BOOK REVIEWER? Want to review our books? Contact me at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com with the subject line indicating that desire. Such as, ‘Seek to review [book Title].’ Be sure to indicate your email address and your name.

 – – – – – – –

R Frederick Riddle is the Editor of TR Writing Services providing help to struggling and/or new authors to write and publish their books. He is also an author of Historical, Speculative, and Mystery fiction, plus co-founder and Vice President of T&R Independent Books. To reply to any blog you have the option of commenting on a blog and/or sending an email to marketing@tr-indbkstore.com. You may also be interested in his Facebook page at RFrederickRiddlesWorld.

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Ron’s Tip of the Day Series or a Single Book

Welcome to Ron’s Tip of the Day. Throughout the week I will share a tip with you. Today I am looking at Series or a Single Book.

Should I Write a Series or a Single Book?

I have written single books and I’ve written books within a series. The answer really depends on you. Some people only want to write one or two books at the most. And that is fine.

For such people I would encourage them to think about multiple books, series or not.

If I Write multiple books should they be in a Series?

Experts contend that a series of books is easier to market which is probably correct. If a reader enjoys one of the books, they are likely to want to read the other books of the series. But as stated above it is up to you.

You may have several books in mind and none of them relate to the others. I say go ahead and write them but remember that marketing will be more difficult.

I Favor a Series

Aside from the aforementioned marketing advantage, a series , in my opinion, lets your imagination explode! One story leads to another.

In my series Christland that is what happened to me. Sometimes I was already working on the next book while still working on the then current book. I’ve now written one complete series, am working on final book of The World That Was and have started working on a new series. I thrive on this!

For information on TR Writing Services (“we edit, proof, and publish the book within you”)  contact us at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com. Our Free booklet tells you about our services. And we are upfront on our prices (all are low).

VISIT MY AUTHOR’S PAGE TODAY: amazon.com/author/rfrederickriddle.

ARE YOU A BOOK REVIEWER? I am always looking for book reviews for R. Frederick Riddle and Tess Riddle books. I value your reviews.

If you would like to review our books contact me at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com with the subject line indicating that desire. An example of an appropriate subject line would be: ‘Seek to review [book Title].’ In the email make sure to indicate your email address, your name, and the choice of copy (PDF or Epub).

 – – – – – – –

R Frederick Riddle is the Editor of TR Writing Services providing help to struggling and/or new authors to write and publish their books. In addition, he is best known for Christian Historical and Speculative Fiction. He is also co-founder and Vice President of T&R Independent Books where his books are featured. To reply to any blog you have the option of commenting on a blog and/or sending an email to marketing@tr-indbkstore.com. You may also be interested in his Facebook page at RFrederickRiddlesWorld.

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Ron’s Tip of the Day What to Write About

Welcome to Ron’s Tip of the Day. Today I am looking at What to Write About.

Ever wonder what you should write about?

I have. And arriving at the answer is not as difficult as you might thing it is.

Genre?

What genres do you enjoy reading? In my case, I love to read books on history, such as seen in the Bible or national history. I love history past and history prewritten (i.e. Old Testament and Revelation). I love reading books about wars and warriors of our past, such as Rome, Israel, England, and America. I have enjoyed our revolutionary war, our civil war, and modern day wars in Iraq and the Middle East. Then there are the stories that take place in the future and concern the End Times.

But I also love Science Fiction plus Mystery. Guess what? These genres have recently become the genres I write in. And that is not an accident. Looking at what you enjoy reading is a good place to go when considering what to write. Yes, check the market. But first check your heart.

Tip of the Day: Enjoy the Do. Whatever you’re doing, enjoy it!

For information on TR Writing Services (“we edit, proof, and publish the book within you”)  contact us at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com. Our Free booklet tells you about our services. And we are upfront on our prices (all are low).

VISIT MY AUTHOR’S PAGE TODAY: amazon.com/author/rfrederickriddle.

ARE YOU A BOOK REVIEWER? I am always looking for book reviews for R. Frederick Riddle and Tess Riddle books. I value your reviews.

If you would like to review our books contact me at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com with the subject line indicating that desire. An example of an appropriate subject line would be: ‘Seek to review [book Title].’ In the email make sure to indicate your email address, your name, and the choice of copy (PDF or Epub).

 – – – – – – –

R Frederick Riddle is the Editor of TR Writing Services providing help to struggling and/or new authors to write and publish their books. In addition, he is best known for Christian Historical and Speculative Fiction. He is also co-founder and Vice President of T&R Independent Books where his books are featured. To reply to any blog you have the option of commenting on a blog and/or sending an email to marketing@tr-indbkstore.com. You may also be interested in his Facebook page at RFrederickRiddlesWorld.

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Ron’s Tip of the Day Multiple Genre

I published my first book in 2003. It was historical fiction based on the worldwide flood that took place in Noah’s day. While that book is no longer in print parts of the story made its way into Perished: The World That Was. That event started my writing career and I still write Historical Fiction. But over time I’ve also started writing Speculative Fiction and now I’m into a third genre, Mystery.

Isn’t it Hard to Write in Multiple Genres?

I guess I’m a glutton for punishment. The answer is yes, it is. Each genre has its own uniqueness, which is not necessarily secret. The differences are out there, and you can embrace them or not.

Can One Book be more than one Genre?

Yes, the genres can be mixed. For example, I am writing my first mystery and it is definitely a mystery, but it is also futuristic. It involves spaceships and other space elements. But it remains a mystery. You can mix genres together, but in my experience, you should probably emphasize one genre over the others.

How do you Mix Genre’s and Emphasize one at the Same Time?

By mixing I’m talking about having more than one genre in your story. But emphasizing is different. The entire story is a mystery. But the story occurs in the future, there are spaceships, and the mystery involves crimes committed in space.

The Tip of the Day is to consider multiple genres.

For information on TR Writing Services (“we edit, proof, and publish the book within you”)  contact us at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com. Our Free booklet tells you about our services. And we are upfront on our prices (all are low).

VISIT MY AUTHOR’S PAGE TODAY: amazon.com/author/rfrederickriddle.

ARE YOU A BOOK REVIEWER? I am always looking for book reviews for R. Frederick Riddle and Tess Riddle books. I value your reviews.

If you would like to review our books contact me at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com with the subject line indicating that desire. An example of an appropriate subject line would be: ‘Seek to review [book Title].’ In the email make sure to indicate your email address, your name, and the choice of copy (PDF or Epub).

 – – – – – – –

R Frederick Riddle is the Editor of TR Writing Services providing help to struggling and/or new authors to write and publish their books. In addition, he is best known for Christian Historical and Speculative Fiction. He is also co-founder and Vice President of T&R Independent Books where his books are featured. To reply to any blog you have the option of commenting on a blog and/or sending an email to marketing@tr-indbkstore.com. You may also be interested in his Facebook page at RFrederickRiddlesWorld.