PC EDITING Part II

Last week I wrote about PC Editing, today is part II. First a quick review:

PC Editing (Proof Copy Editing) is a term I invented because an Indie author generally does the editing, copy editing, and proofreading themselves. PC Editing incorporates all of these responsibilities.

PCE is the practice of examining manuscripts from the earliest draft through the continuous copyediting until the final draft. Then proofing kicks in as the final draft is prepared for publication.

After posting the blog I received the following comment:

Instead of the things that you list, mine editing tips for indie authors would be stuff like:

As the author of the chapter, you’re already emotionally invested in the characters and events. Pretend that your only knowledge of these characters and events come from the words on the page. Do those words engage you? Or do they bore you to tears? Do they make you care about the characters? Or do they bore you to tears? Are you excited to know what happens next? Or are you bored to tears?

Okay, so not much of a list. Just don’t bore your readers, which is the main problem I find with writers new enough to find lists like yours useful.”

My response: Interesting comment. I don’t oppose what you say, but bringing your characters alive is more than editing. I teach this prior to editing. The process of creating great characters begins at the beginning and carries through the entire experience. My blog was dealing with the basics of editing which probably should have included your points. So thank you for pointing that out.

I thought the writer was going to write more on the subject that I could include. But I haven’t received anything.

But he is correct. The characters need to be believable. It doesn’t matter if they are historical or fictional. Thus it is important for you to create characters that draw the reader in.

It is well to consider that your characters are human and humans have desires and flaws. When creating a character make him/her as real as possible.

For example, mankind has a perpetual desire to return to the innocence of the Garden of Eden. Some people believe this and some don’t, but all have it. Some even envision an idyllic world where man is at peace with his surroundings, himself, and with God.

How does this impact a novel? The truth is that every novel ever written or to be written is impacted in some way. The degree of impact will depend on the author’s understanding of that desire and ability to put it to paper.

The exciting thing is that your fictional characters start out with nothing and you can build on that. Then again, your character may be a real person. In the book Perished: The World That Was many of the characters were real, lifted right off the pages of the Bible. Therefore some characteristics or traits were already known. Even so I was able to take those few facts and develop the characters further.

In the case of Adam there was a constant inner desire to return to the Garden where he walked with God. But that was impossible. So what did he do? He built a small garden within his home and called it Little Eden. It was a place for quiet meditation or important meetings. That yearning was never really addressed but it expressed itself several times within the story.

The Yearning Factor

Your character is going to have strong and weak desires. Those desires will shape his/her expectations, experiences, and decisions as the story moves forward. So your first duty is to identify the Yearning Factor.

Basically the Yearning Factor is the primary desire of your character. So ask yourself, What motivates my character? How deep does it go? What does the character believe about him/herself?

Since your character starts out with nothing, you can start molding it right away. You can either tell (narrate) certain facts that reveal the character to some extent or you can let the character demonstrate it. Often you can do this by exploring the character’s past. Have there been broken hearts? Perhaps your character has desired things in the past and failed to realized them. Or perhaps your character has flaws that has prevented those desires from being attained.

The key is to know your characters strengths, and weaknesses. A well-written character grows from the beginning of the book to the end with constant, if not obvious, progress toward that goal. The character’s reaction to events transpiring in the story will both reflect and develop the desire.

So during the editing process  take a closer look at your character(s). As the commentator said ask yourself some questions:

  1. Are you (as the reader) engaged?
  2. Do the characters bore you to tears?
  3. Do you care about the characters?
  4. Are you excited to know what happens next?

If you’re engaged, interested, caring, and excited then you probably have created characters that others will care about and get excited about.

Here’s a thought to consider: The end of the story represents the end of the quest. Your character never truly attains the goal or desire. In life we end up with a mixture of successes and failures. To be realistic let your character also experience success and a small degree of failure. Perhaps a victory doesn’t satisfy as much as the character anticipated.

If this character will be a part of another forthcoming novel let the character develop and expand in that future novel. You can even put little teasers in the first book that will be answered in the second.

Developing strong characters not only enhances your book but builds your voice.

What is voice? There are probably a dozen or more interpretations, but essentially your voice is:

An author’s unique style and way of saying things. You should be able to recognize an author’s written voice the way you recognize a person’s spoken voice. In creative writing, one goal is to develop your written voice.”

This covers more than characters, it covers your entire story. As people read your stories they will learn what makes you unique and interesting. So having strong, interesting characters builds your voice.

As stated in the first blog, PC Editing basically finds and removes the most objectionable errors. The more often your manuscript is reviewed, the more often you will streamline your book. So don’t fall in love with a character or a scene or anything. Be ready to edit it or even remove it!

PC Editing is a process that you want to master. Put your own spin on it. The primary goal is to make your manuscript as error proof as possible.

PC Editing is a needful practice for the Indie Author. It is your responsibility to create an entertaining, gripping novel. If you fail to do this you will likely fail as an author.

One final thought.

Don’t worry so much about what others think of your book. What do you think and feel? There are always critics. Some will delight in tearing down your book and you. But if you can honestly say you like your books plus the characters and events in the book, then it is likely others will agree.

At the same time, don’t be satisfied. As you begin a new novel determine to make improvements in your characters and story line. You should learn and grow as a writer after each book is published.

Feel free to comment on this blog. As you can see I read your comments and may include them in a future blog. But whether I do or don’t, you can be sure that I will read it!

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R. Frederick Riddle is the author of several books. For more information on him visit his Amazon Authors Page. He is also co-founder and Vice President of T&R Independent Books where his books are featured.

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The World That Was: Methuselah

We have been looking at how I wrote The World That Was series. Today I will take a look at character development as it relates to Methuselah.

We know very little about Methuselah other than he was the grandfather of Noah and he was the oldest person who ever lived. After that our knowledge takes a nosedive.

While this creates a challenge it also opens wide an opportunity. Developing Methuselah was challenging, yes. But I was able to create his character almost from scratch.

Since I believe that God gave him long life for a reason and his life coincided with the building of the Ark, I imagined him as having a major role. In addition, I thought of him as a leader both in war and in ruling.

In those days there was no government as we know it. That didn’t happen until after the Flood. But man always seeks to rule others. So it was easy to see him as a general and, perhaps later, as a ruler. If a ruler he would have ruled by decree. There would have been no laws, no courts, and no prisons.

With these assumptions in mind I was able to create the character of Methuselah as a man who loved God, who rose to be a general and a great ruler. Because he loved God he became involved financially in support of the building of the Ark.

While much of his life is fictional in the book, it is also believable. And that is what we strive for: a character bigger than life who is believable. Such a character adds to the overall impact of the story.

This is another example of using imagination. Imagination is something we emphasize in Authors Academy. While having an imagination is something you have or don’t (and if you don’t you are in the wrong business), we can give you principles for employing it.

Your comments are welcome. Just make a comment below.

 

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R. Frederick Riddle is the author of several books. For more information on him visit his Amazon Authors Page. He is also co-founder and Vice President of T&R Independent Books where his books are featured.

PC Editing

PC Editing (Proof Copy Editing) is a term I invented because an Indie author generally does the editing, copy editing, and proofreading themselves. PC Editing incorporates all of these responsibilities.
 You can divide this into three areas:
Copy Editing – This concerns examining drafts for:

  1. Proper grammar
  2. Spelling
  3. Word use
  4. Consistency (spelling of names are consistent throughout, etc.)

 ProofreadingThis is typically done after all copy editing is done. It is making your final draft ready to submit for publishing.
So, PCE is: the practice of examining manuscripts from the earliest draft through the continuous copy editing until the final draft. Then proofing kicks in as the final draft is prepared for publication.
How do you copy edit?
Have you heard the term KISS – Keep It Simple Stupid? Not a nice way of saying something, but it does apply to editing. The simpler your story writing the better it flows and the more satisfied your reader. With that in mind I have provided below 13 editing rules.
 

  1. Avoid long sentences whenever possible. Short sentences tend to speed up the story flow while long sentences tend to bog the story down.
  2. Stay with one voice, either 1st person or 3rd person.
  3. Limit use of adverbs (i.e., words ending with “ly”).
  4. Watch your punctuation.
  5. Avoid overusing parentheses,  colons and the like.
  6. Avoid redundancies, such as ‘exact same thing.’
  7. Use common words rather than jargon or slang.
  8. Keep prepositions to a minimum. Sometimes you need to add ‘of,’ ‘to,’ ‘for,’ etc. but probably not as much as you are doing.
  9. Watch words like ‘that,’ ‘thing,’ ‘start to,’ ‘in order to,’ ‘very,’ and ‘really.’
  10. Avoid use of a passive voice.
  11. Always refer to people as ‘who.”Let your writing be personable.
  12. Use contractions (that’s instead of that is).
  13. Watch your spelling.

OK, we have a set of rules to follow. How do you edit? Different people have different ideas, but I prefer the following:
 
EIY (Edit it Yourself)

  • Many professionals will cry out not to do this, but it is an option that works if done properly.
  • Be the first to review your work and make corrections.
  • Have corrected copy reviewed by someone else, then edit.
  • Get a third person to review, then you edit.
  • Repeat these steps as often as you can.

 
PC Editing basically finds and removes the most objectionable errors. The more often your manuscript is reviewed, the more often you will streamline your book.
PC Editing is a process that you want to master. Put your own spin on it. The primary goal is to make your manuscript as error proof as possible. By the way, take with a grain of salt claims by some authors that they don’t make any errors. I have read great novels by celebrated authors and found errors. At the same time, don’t take a “whatever will be” attitude. Strive for perfection, but don’t get hung up on it.
Being an Indie Author puts a lot of responsibility and pressure on you, but you can do it. And the satisfaction that comes from a well-written novel is tremendous.
I might suggest that after you have completed the PC Editing process that you reward yourself. The old way of editing was to hire editors. So why not pay yourself for doing the work. Perhaps money in the bank, a nice dinner out, or buy something for yourself.

Do you have comments or questions? Leave a reply in the box below. And don’t forget to “follow” my blog.

Your #1 Writing Problem!

As you may know my blog So You Want To Write? deals with the how of writing. Today I am giving you the opportunity to voice your opinion about YOUR problems when writing. What are they? How do you handle them? What is your greatest need? What topics would you like covered in the future?

When responding please include your name and email address.

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So You Want To Write? is a blog written by R. Frederick Riddle – author, editor, instructor. He is co-founder of T&R Independent Books, instructor at Authors Academy and the author of several books.

For more information you can contact him at information@rfrederickriddle.com. Please indicate question in subject line.

The World That Was: Enoch

We have been looking at how I wrote The World That Was series. Today I will take a look at character developmenPerished - the hardcovert as it relates to Enoch.

Let’s begin by taking a look at Scripture:

“And Jared lived an hundred sixty and two years, and he begat Enoch: And Jared lived after he begat Enoch eight hundred years, and begat sons and daughters. And all the days of Jared were nine hundred sixty and two years: and he died.

And Enoch lived sixty and five years, and begat Methuselah: And Enoch walked with God after he begat Methuselah three hundred years, and begat sons and daughters: And all the days of Enoch were three hundred sixty and five years: And Enoch walked with God: and he was not; for God took him.”

Aside from this passage in Genesis 5:18-24 you also have a passage in Jude:

“And Enoch also, the seventh from Adam, prophesied of these, saying, Behold, the Lord cometh with ten thousands of his saints, To execute judgment upon all, and to convince all that are ungodly among them of all their ungodly deeds which they have ungodly committed, and of all their hard speeches which ungodly sinners have spoken against him.”

Basically that is all you have in the Bible about this great man of God. I recently came across a site that contends that Enoch was a black man and that is the reason the Book of Enoch is not in the Bible. Pure garbage.

But was he black? We really don’t know. However, recent scientific discoveries and theories demonstrate that Adam and Eve probably had all the genes necessary for their descendants to have different coloring. In fact, Ham was probably black or near black and not because of any curse. He was born that way.

I won’t spend a lot of time on this subject but the idea of races and racism itself did not come along until the rise of evolution. The Bible speaks of one race, of one blood. Racism is not found in the Bible and has no place in Christendom. You do find national envy and hatred in the Bible, but not racism.

But who was Enoch?

According to the Scriptures he was a faithful man of God. According to Jude he was a preacher, perhaps a prophet. He was also a father and grandfather, so he had a family.

When writing about him in Perished: The World That Was I zeroed in on his faith. I could easily picture him traveling about and preaching to people. Although the Bible doesn’t say, I imagined him training others to also worship and serve God.

Here is a case of taking a little information and expanding upon it. I built an entire character on only a little bit of fact. But I did so without violating the Scriptures themselves. Sometimes a character like Enoch proves easy to develop partly from lack of information.

What principle can you take from this?

First, don’t let the absence of facts stop you. Secondly, take the few facts you have and place the character in situations where those facts might trigger your imagination.

Remember that I said in my article on Adam that I believe your imagination is the most valuable tool a writer possesses. If you can put yourself within your character and express the result to your readers, you have the beginning of a successful story.

Imagination is something we emphasize in Authors Academy. While having an imagination is something you have or don’t (and if you don’t you are in the wrong business), but we can give you principles for employing it.

Your comments are welcome. Just go to my Facebook page and leave a comment about this article.

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R. Frederick Riddle is the author of several books. For more information on him visit his Amazon Authors Page. He is also co-founder and Vice President of T&R Independent Books where his books are featured.

GRAMMAR

Your grammar must be perfect!

Right?

Depends on who you talk to and the specifics involved. Here is my take:

Generally speaking you want your grammar usage as correct as possible, but there are exceptions. For example, let’s say one of your characters only has a ninth grade education.

You would not want that character talking like a professor. For that matter, you really don’t want any of your characters to talk that way unless they actually are professors.

Now I don’t recommend that you try to imitate slang and accents, but just be cautious. Maybe allow a character to have a favorite saying. In Perished: The World That Was I had Methuselah with a favorite saying, “So God has said, so shall it be.”

Which brings up a related principle: Be consistent. If I later had someone else using that same phrase it could have been a jolt. Be consistent.

So here’s the principle: When you are dealing with conversation (or even thoughts) you can and should be less than perfect but consistent. Everything else should be perfect.

Aside from speaking, there is the matter of punctuation and spelling. With the tools available this should never be a problem, but it does sometimes. It is therefore necessary to check your spelling and punctuation as often as possible.

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Tips

Be consistent. If Bob is talking like a country boy on page 2 and a professor on page 132, you better have shown a transformation. Your reader will spot inconsistencies!

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 Example

The boys is clothed alike. This is poor grammar.

The boys are clothed alike. Much better.

“You guys look the same.” OK.

“The boys is clothed alike,” Martha said. OK, if this is consistent with Martha’s education.

Application

Both my wife and I try to watch our grammar usage. One of the tools we use is Microsoft Word’s grammar checker. It’s not perfect, but it helps. Also, we use the spell check, but it is not always up-to-date.

Other resources are grammar books (especially older versions that really emphasized good grammar), and the internet.

Make use of as many resources as needed. And pay attention to grammar and punctuation when editing.

Your comments are welcome. Just go to my Facebook page and leave a comment about this article.

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 R. Frederick Riddle is the author of several books. For more information on him visit his Amazon Authors Page. He is also co-founder and Vice President of T&R Independent Books where his books are featured.

Book Marketing: Blogging

Obviously I believe in blogging. But how about blogging as a marketing tool?

There are several reasons for blogging:

  1. For the fun of it.
  2. To be helpful to others.
  3. To market a product or service.
  4. To promote an event.

While I do enjoy blogging I am not in it for the fun of it. However, I do want to be helpful, I do want to market myself, and sometimes I do want to promote an event.

All of these are legitimate reasons for blogging. When I first started blogging the primary reason was to market myself, but that is no longer the case.

Over the years I have learned a thing or two about writing, publishing, and marketing. I have not only learned, but I have formed strong opinions. And I want to help other writers learn the same skills I learned without the same hard work.

Blogging enables me to communicate truths, techniques, and ideas to you for your benefit. This information is free to you because I believe it is necessary for every writer to know.

As for marketing, yes blogging is still a valid marketing tool. Through blogging I make people aware of the Authors Academy where they can study at a low cost (currently at a reduced price of a one-time fee of $7.00).

I can also blog about my books. I genuinely believe that my novels bring historical characters, especially Biblical characters, alive and perhaps give the reader insights they may not have known.

Do you blog? If so, what is your purpose?

Mine, of course, is writing, publishing, and marketing. Although I may at times stray from that theme, it dominates the blog. When I first knew I wanted to write I sought instruction. But it was not widely available. I did find one source that was helpful, but it wasn’t free. It was a low cost monthy subscription.

But when hard financial times struck I could no longer afford the monthly cost and had to drop out. This meant that it took me a lot longer to learn my craft. It was for that reason that Authors Academy eventually was started: to provide a good solid foundation for anyone desiring to write a book.

I recommend you blog. Find a subject that you know and focus on it. Get a blog host (I use Word Press). Then start blogging!

It will take a while to build a following, but it is worth it. But try to establish a pattern. The more often you blog and the more you blog each week will eventually draw followers.

Your comments are welcome. Just go to my Facebook page and leave a comment about this article.

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R. Frederick Riddle is the author of several books. For more information on him visit his Amazon Authors Page. He is also co-founder and Vice President of T&R Independent Books where his books are featured.

The World That Was: Adam

We have been looking at how I wrote The World That Was series. Today I will take a look at character development as it relates to Adam.

You might wonder what could possibly be difficult about creating the character Adam? After all, he is the primary character, other than God, in the first four chapters of Genesis. What’s so difficult?

It was difficult for the very reason that Adam is so well known. Anybody who has read those first four chapters has formed in their mind an image of what he was like. And the Bible gives insights. My task therefore required me to be very careful to make his personality fit what the Bible describes and hints at.

First, here are some basic facts found in the Bible:

1.     Adam was created from earth (clay?) by God
2.     Adam was the first human
3.     God gave him great intelligence (his offspring invented music, worked with brass (mining & industrial processes), established religion and more
4.     God placed him in the Garden of Eden
5.     God gave him a wife
6.     God fellowshipped with them morning & night (cool of day)
7.     Adam sinned
8.     Adam was expelled from the Garden
9.     Adam believed and worshipped God
10. Adam fathered at least three sons and possible three or more daughters

These are ten basic facts. You can discover more by studying the Bible. It provides a general insight into the man. But I needed more.

So how did I do it?

The first thing was to become familiar with his story as it is related in the Bible. Being something of a Bible student that wasn’t hard. I also needed to be aware of his unique relationship with God plus his life with Eve in and out of the Garden.

That last point provided me the spark my imagination needed. What was the Garden like? I did a lot of research on gardens, but eventually I settled on the fact that this was not like some backyard garden. It probably was more like the Amazon.

It was a perfect world that Adam found himself within. And when God created Eve, he had a perfect wife! This was all before sin corrupted us, so such perfection can not be found today. (I love my wife dearly, but she has a sin nature just like me, so that rules out perfection. Although she comes close.)

As I studied these questions I was able to put Adam in differing situations. This required me to step inside the man and become him. Then it was, As Adam how do I react to the Garden? What fascinates me? How do I relate to Woman (Eve)? These questions triggered my imagination.

More difficult than that was Adam’s relationship with God, his Creator. As Adam how did I view God? As Creator? As my Friend? Myriad possibilities. Added to that I had to be very careful about God Himself.

In writing about God I followed a very simple principle: Not to have God do anything or say anything that was not found elsewhere in the Bible. That was tough, but I believe I held to that principle successfully. Thus, the God of my novel was consistent with the God of the Bible.

Actually that principle is good for writing about any well-known historical figure. But it was an absolute must regarding God.

Back to Adam. Another principle I employed was: put myself in his shoes (so to speak). I referred to that above. But it is important enough to go deeper. When writing about your characters, especially your primary character, it is a big plus if you can become that character.

For example, I needed to put myself in Adam’s character and imagine my reaction to the first sin. That wasn’t impossible since I know how I feel whenever I sin; it is terrible guilt! With Adam it would have been magnified! And then there was the expulsion! The Garden of Eden was his home, the only home he had known. How did he feel and how did he react to being cast out?

Identifying with Adam enabled me to demonstrate his sorrow, his strength to handle the murder of Abel, and the building of “Little Eden.” This last was my imagination let loose. If I had been Adam I would have felt tremendous guilt, but I also would have remember the wonderful days in Eden. And I wouldn’t want to forget it! Thus, when I built my first home, and everyone thereafter, I would have built within the house a small place (perhaps a courtyard) where I could meditate and remember God. I might even call it “Little Eden.”

Once I had the character of Adam clearly embedded in my mind, I was able to trace out his history as the years went by and he faced different scenarios, virtually all for the first time.

All in all it was quite a humbling and satisfying experience. I used two very important principles:

1.     Not to have God do anything or say anything that was not found elsewhere in the Bible.

2.     Put myself in my character’s shoes.

I believe that your imagination is the most valuable tool a writer possesses. If you can put yourself within your character and express the result to your readers, you have the beginning of a successful story.

Imagination is something we emphasize in Authors Academy. While having an imagination is something you have or don’t (and if you don’t you are in the wrong business), but we can give you principles for employing it.

Your comments are welcome. Just go to my Facebook page and leave a comment about this article.

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R. Frederick Riddle is the author of several books. For more information on him visit his Amazon Authors Page. He is also co-founder and Vice President of T&R Independent Books where his books are featured.

GENRE

First, let’s explain Genre. It is defined in Wikipedia as: A literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content, or even (as in the case of fiction) length. The distinctions between genres and categories are flexible and loosely defined, often with subgroups.

Principle

There are many Genre subgroups. So you, the author, must decide which subgroup(s) your writing fits. Discovering your genre will be a valuable aid not only in marketing, but in the writing and publishing of your book.

Don’t brush this aside. When I first began writing I didn’t even know what genre was, let alone which one I was under. At best I knew that I was writing fiction.

As time went on I began understanding the meaning and importance of genre. The more I learned, the better my writing and my marketing.

Tips

Take a close look at your writing. It is probably more than a single genre. And that is good! Identify all the genres your book would fit within.

Example

In my case I write both fiction and non-fiction. In the fiction arena my genres have been American History, and Bible history. But my writing genres are also: Adventure, Romance, and even some Mystery.

My non-fiction works have been on American History, Bible History, Politics, and How To.

Application

Identifying your genres will be crucial when you get around to marketing your books. It will also help you in determining such things as your audience. This is very important as you will want to specify who your marketing efforts are aimed at. Otherwise you might be putting forth great ads with excellent content but reaching an audience that is not interested. And that would be a disaster!

As stated in the Principle it also affects your writing and publishing. In writing, knowing your genre keeps you on mark. Meanwhile in publishing, it helps you in selecting your publisher.

Your comments are welcome. Just go to my Facebook page and leave a comment about this article.

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R. Frederick Riddle is the author of several books. For more information on him visit his Amazon Authors Page. He is also co-founder and Vice President of T&R Independent Books where his books are featured.

Multiple Third Person

Viewpoint or Point of View (POV) is critical to your story. The Point of View allows the reader to experience someone else’s (yours or the character’s) view of the world. Last Monday we looked at Third Person viewpoint. Today we take a look at Multiple Third Person.

 Imagine yourself as a reader who gets to read the minds of the characters. Not necessarily all the time, but at critical times. It gives you, the reader, the power and knowledge to understand what is going on to a greater degree.

 In Third Person Viewpoints you are reading or “listening” to the thoughts of the primary character. But in Multiple Third Person Viewpoints this is multiplied so that the reader has the opportunity to grasp more and understand more.

 That being said, I would not suggest too many characters at one time. Generally I try to limit to two or three characters. And only with the primary character do I have constant contact.

If you have more than one character with a POV you need to transition from one to another. Here’s the problem: Your reader is in the head of one of the characters and suddenly you switch to another character’s POV.

This can be very disruptive to the reader. You must transition from one character to another to keep the reader engaged.

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 Tip #1 – Generally, multiple characters with observable viewpoints should be introduced early. However, in books spanning many years it is possible to distant them (as in Perished: The World That Was).

 Tip #2 – Unless you are truly great with prose keep your primary character as your primary POV. In books like Perished you can change the primary character but make sure the transition is smooth.

 Tip #3 – You must transition between POV’s. You will lose the reader if you don’t.

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 Example

 In Perished: The World That Was you have a book covering 1656 years. It starts with Adam being the primary character but he eventually dies and another takes his place. This continues until Noah becomes the primary.

 In each case there was a transition (either death or simply a “changing of the guard” (so to speak)).

 I do not recommend doing this in a story that is more compressed in time. Most likely your primary character will be constant throughout.

 Another example from the same book is the inclusion of multiple primary characters. But it is rare for both to appear in the same scene at the same time. If such a situation presents itself, however, only one should be the primary at that time.

 Application

 Multiple Person Viewpoint is in my opinion the most flexible (and hardest) viewpoint for the author to use. That flexibility is a valuable asset for the author. So don’t shy away from it.

 Try it out. Buy books on viewpoint and learn what works for you.

 Your comments are welcome. Just go to my Facebook page and leave a comment about this article.

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 R. Frederick Riddle is the author of several books. For more information on him visit his Amazon Authors Page. He is also co-founder and Vice President of T&R Independent Books where his books are featured.