Ron’s Tip of the Day Become the Character

Welcome to Ron’s Tip of the Day. Today I am looking at Become the Character.

There is a lot of good advice about character traits. We can all learn to do better regarding our character traits. But why not go further and become the character?

What Does Become the Character mean?

It means that you (the writer) immerse yourself into the character. You let the character live the story instead of you forcing the character into a certain mold. There are a lot of areas where you the writer dominate and decide. But the actual details should be generated by the character.

For example, in my book Perished, when Adam was talking or doing something, I became him. I saw what Adam saw, experienced what he experienced, and thereby made decisions. These decisions were his not mine the author. How did I do that?

First, although Adam is an historical person, I am the person who created his personality in the book. Second, because of that I knew him and felt him. And third, I let my imagination impose his personality upon mine. Finally, Adam became the author, writing his own scenes.

Does that make sense?

Chances are you have gone through a similar process but just didn’t realize it. You know your character inside/out, so why not take that next step and let the character take control?

Tip of the Day: Use your imagination and let the character take control.

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Let’s do it!

VISIT MY AUTHOR’S PAGE TODAY: amazon.com/author/rfrederickriddle.

ARE YOU A BOOK REVIEWER? I am always looking for book reviews for R. Frederick Riddle and Tess Riddle books. I value your reviews.

If you would like to review our books contact me at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com with the subject line indicating that desire. An example of an appropriate subject line would be: ‘Seek to review [book Title].’ In the email make sure to indicate your email address, your name, and the choice of copy (PDF or Epub).

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R Frederick Riddle is the Editor of TR Writing Services providing help to struggling and/or new authors to write and publish their books. In addition, he is best known for Christian Historical and Speculative Fiction. He is also co-founder and Vice President of T&R Independent Books where his books are featured. To reply to any blog you have the option of commenting on a blog and/or sending an email to marketing@tr-indbkstore.com. You may also be interested in his Facebook page at RFrederickRiddlesWorld.

Ron’s Tip of the Day Character’s Thoughts

Welcome to Ron’s Tip of the Day. Today I am looking at Character’s Thoughts.

In today’s blog I am discussing how to make use of your character’s thoughts in your book. There is more than one way to do this, but I prefer using italics to indicate thoughts. Let’s take a look.

Here is a sample.

Henry thought to himself that to cross the river would be too difficult.

While some would accept that method, it is really the narrator telling you what Henry thought. But when I use thoughts, I want the readers to feel like they are actually listening into Henry’s thoughts. Something like this:

Henry stared at the river. This is going to be more difficult than I imagined!

By doing it this way I conveyed several bits of information. For example, you could gather that Henry had been thinking about this crossing for a while, plus he already had determined it would be a difficult crossing. But seeing it up close made him realize he’d underestimated the difficulty. All of these are possible depending on context.

When you access a person’s thoughts and listen to that person, you gain more information than a narrator could provide in the same amount of text. It only took one sentence for you to hear the character. But it took three sentences for me to describe what you might have discerned.

You can use this technique for one or for more characters. However, be very careful about using multiple characters at the same time. It’s okay to use different characters over time, but it can be problematic in the same scene.

Tip of the Day : Use italics to indicate thoughts

For information on TR Writing Services (“we edit, proof, and publish the book within you”)  contact us at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com. Our Free booklet tells you about our services. And we are upfront on our prices (all are low).

VISIT MY AUTHOR’S PAGE TODAY: amazon.com/author/rfrederickriddle.

ARE YOU A BOOK REVIEWER? I am always looking for book reviews for R. Frederick Riddle and Tess Riddle books. I value your reviews.

If you would like to review our books contact me at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com with the subject line indicating that desire. An example of an appropriate subject line would be: ‘Seek to review [book Title].’ In the email make sure to indicate your email address, your name, and the choice of copy (PDF or Epub).

 – – – – – – –

R Frederick Riddle is the Editor of TR Writing Services providing help to struggling and/or new authors to write and publish their books. In addition, he is best known for Christian Historical and Speculative Fiction. He is also co-founder and Vice President of T&R Independent Books where his books are featured. To reply to any blog you have the option of commenting on a blog and/or sending an email to marketing@tr-indbkstore.com. You may also be interested in his Facebook page at RFrederickRiddlesWorld.

Insights From World of Shem Part 6

In this issue I will speak on building a character.

When I started writing my first novel I thought I knew how to build characters. But I found there was much to learn. And now after writing a total of 6 novels I am still learning.

In writing the World of Shem I had a unique problem. Usually in writing a novel you build your character from scratch. But in this case, as in my previous novels, I faced actual historical figures wherein certain aspects of their personalities were known. You’d think this made my job easier, but not really. With parts of their personalities already known I had to develop those personalities so that they were consistent with the historical record.

I’ve often talked about research and once again I point to the importance of your doing your research. So I had to first thoroughly acquaint myself with Shem and other historical people, then build upward from that basic knowledge.

For example, in developing Shem I had to make sure that his character was consistent with the historical and biblical known facts. I also took into consideration tradition. A good example of this is the Jewish tradition that Shem was Melchizedek. Not all Jews believed this but some did and I adopted that for the book. But that created another problem: namely that I had to make sure the character not only met the known facts about Shem but also about Melchizedek. And this meant it had to be consistent with the Bible, which I accomplished.

Now I didn’t have to prove they were one and the same person, but it had to be believable. That is why I included the fact that Melchizedek was likely a title rather than a name (much like pharaoh). Combining these facts together to make one person required research, patience, and care.

But that is what you need to do for any of your characters. You want them to stand out on their own. And the only way I know of doing this on a consistent basis is to consistently learn and apply from your very first character to your latest character. Each time you develop a character, whether based on a historical figure or an imaginary figure, you add to your skill set. Then the next character benefits from what you have learned. Hopefully each succeeding book and character is better than the last.

The more often you write the more confident you will get. And the more confident you get the better your characters will come across. This is key to your success. If you don’t believe in your characters you can hardly expect your readers to believe in them. So make this skill a priority in your writing.

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R Frederick Riddle is the author of several books and is best known for Christian Historical Fiction. For more information on him or his books visit his Amazon Authors Page. He is also co-founder and Vice President of T&R Independent Books where his books are featured. To reply to any blog you have the option of commenting on a blog and/or sending an email to marketing@tr-indbkstore.com. You may also be interested in his Facebook page at RFrederickRiddlesWorld.