Ron’s Tip of the Day The Right Mixture #4

Welcome to Ron’s Tip of the Day. Throughout the week I will share a tip with you. Today I am looking at The Right Mixture #4.

In my last 3 blogs I talked about readers’ imagination, including Immerse Yourself in the character, Backstory, and Making it Real. Today we move to Research.

Research? Again?

I probably talk about research more than any other topic related to writing. And here is another as it relates to my last blog of Making it Real.

How does Research Make it Real?

Part of making your story realistic is to have the right information about a place or event. I am currently writing a story which partially takes place in a major American city. And I am doing the necessary research. If I haven’t been there it means digging deep so that people who have been there will recognize it. They’ll be able to picture the scene.

Why is that Necessary?

Remember those people I mentioned above. If I mention something and don’t describe it right, they will notice it. And it might ruin their reading experience.

I’ve used this example before, but I once read a story based on Noah and the Ark. At that time, I was working on a novel of my own about the Ark. I read this man’s novel and enjoyed it to an extent. But because he described unlikely items, such as a drinking glass, I didn’t enjoy it as much. I found myself looking for other mistakes instead of simply enjoying the book. You don’t want that to happen with your books.

Research Adds to the Story.

Proper research and usage add to the story sometimes subtly and sometimes noticeably. It’s an excellent tool.

More on the Right Mixture next blog.

Tip of the Day: Use research as a writing tool.

Get our free Guide to Writing by contacting us at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com. We will send you our Free Brochure which tells you about our services.

For information on TR Writing Services (“we edit, proof, and publish the book within you”)  contact us at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com.

AUTHOR’S PAGE: amazon.com/author/rfrederickriddle.

ARE YOU A BOOK REVIEWER? Want to review our books? Contact me at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com with the subject line indicating that desire. Such as, ‘Seek to review [book Title].’ Be sure to indicate your email address and your name.

 – – – – – – –

R Frederick Riddle is the Editor of TR Writing Services providing help to struggling and/or new authors to write and publish their books. He is also an author of Historical, Speculative, and Mystery fiction, plus co-founder and Vice President of T&R Independent Books. To reply to any blog you have the option of commenting on a blog and/or sending an email to marketing@tr-indbkstore.com. You may also be interested in his Facebook page at RFrederickRiddlesWorld.

Ron’s Tip of the Day Want to Write Biblical Novels?

Welcome to Ron’s Tip of the Day. Throughout the week I will share a tip with you. Today I am looking at Want to Write Biblical Novels?

Writing a Bible-based novel can be successful or risky. But if you use these simple guidelines you should be able to appeal to a large audience.

  • Always assume the Bible is correct

You get messed up if you accept the popular myth that modern science knows better. Science can shed light upon the Bible, but it can never contradict the Bible.

  • Do Your Diligent Research

Use the Bible as a filter, a spotlight or research. When you find a new ‘fact’ shine the spotlight upon it. In my novels I studied the clothing, foods, weapons,and more of that era.

  • Work the Biblical Text into the Story

Sometimes take a direct quote of one or more verses and make them part of the story. Mix the Bible and modern English together so the characters speak using both interchangeably.

  • Use Bible Characters

This is unavoidable but good. If your reader is familiar with the Bible, there will be a common connection between your novel and the Bible.

  • Try avoiding conflicting characters

But the Bible may have more than one character with the same name. This creates a difficulty especially for readers who skip (one reviewer skipped and claimed I was inconsistent with my characters).

  • Use only one Bible version

You can use other versions to increase your own understanding, but only use one in the book. Otherwise you run the risk of confusing your reader. I use only KJV because I believe it is the only accurate version.

  • Don’t Be Preachy

That doesn’t mean no gospel nor no sermons or other Christian statements. It means not being overbearing. The gospel, sermons, etc., should all fit within your story seamlessly!

Tip of the Day: Use above guidelines.

Get our free Guide to Writing by contacting us at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com. We will send you our Free Brochure which tells you about our services.

For information on TR Writing Services (“we edit, proof, and publish the book within you”)  contact us at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com.

AUTHOR’S PAGE: amazon.com/author/rfrederickriddle.

ARE YOU A BOOK REVIEWER? Want to review our books? Contact me at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com with the subject line indicating that desire. Such as, ‘Seek to review [book Title].’ Be sure to indicate your email address and your name.

 – – – – – – –

R Frederick Riddle is the Editor of TR Writing Services providing help to struggling and/or new authors to write and publish their books. He is also an author of Historical, Speculative, and Mystery fiction, plus co-founder and Vice President of T&R Independent Books. To reply to any blog you have the option of commenting on a blog and/or sending an email to marketing@tr-indbkstore.com. You may also be interested in his Facebook page at RFrederickRiddlesWorld.

Ron’s Tip of the Day Writing a Series Pt 2

Welcome to Ron’s Tip of the Day. Throughout the week I will share a tip with you. This is an experiment in microblogging. Let me know how I’m doing. Today I am looking at Writing a Series Pt 2.

This is the second part of a two-part series. In Part 1 we looked at the advantages of writing a series. Today we look at the How.

Tips

Here is a breakdown of the 5 advantages turned into tips.

  • I, the writer, can connect my thoughts from one book to another
    • Plant the seeds for the next book in the current book
    • Successfully close current story or plot
  • There is continuity for the reader
    • Leave threads unresolved at end of current book
    • In next book have thoughts, events, etc. ‘look back’ to previous book
  • Research is still there, but not nearly as much
    • Research is always an option
    • Research enables you, the writer, to explore and expand story and series
    • Use Internet, books, movies/videos, and more to develop ideas
  • Author has already laid out the location, time period, and customs
    • When writing new book use previous book as a resource
    • Add new vital information that can be used and expanded in later books
  • It makes writing easier
    • It helps you stay focused on characters and storyline
    • It can speed up your writing
    • It gives you a consistent platform

Generally speaking that is all you need to know. Begin here and allow yourself to grow.

Tip of the Day: Seriously consider turning your book into a series.

For information on TR Writing Services (“we edit, proof, and publish the book within you”)  contact us at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com. Our Free booklet tells you about our services. And we are upfront on our prices (all are low).

VISIT MY AUTHOR’S PAGE TODAY: amazon.com/author/rfrederickriddle.

ARE YOU A BOOK REVIEWER? I am always looking for book reviews for R. Frederick Riddle and Tess Riddle books. I value your reviews.

If you would like to review our books contact me at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com with the subject line indicating that desire. An example of an appropriate subject line would be: ‘Seek to review [book Title].’ In the email make sure to indicate your email address, your name, and the choice of copy (PDF or Epub).

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R Frederick Riddle is the Editor of TR Writing Services providing help to struggling and/or new authors to write and publish their books. In addition, he is best known for Christian Historical and Speculative Fiction. He is also co-founder and Vice President of T&R Independent Books where his books are featured. To reply to any blog you have the option of commenting on a blog and/or sending an email to marketing@tr-indbkstore.com. You may also be interested in his Facebook page at RFrederickRiddlesWorld.

Ron’s Tip of the Day Writing a Series Pt 1

Welcome to Ron’s Tip of the Day. Throughout the week I will share a tip with you. This is an experiment in microblogging. Let me know how I’m doing. Today I am looking at Writing a Series Pt 1.

Should I Write a Series?

New writers are often advised to write a series. The argument is you have a better marketing opportunity. If a reader likes one, he/she will  likely buy the others. Is it true?

Yes. But there are other issues to be dealt with. Does the writer’s book have series potential? I know of people who want to write a story about theirs or someone else’s life and that’s all. A good writer could turn that book into a series, but first does that person really want to put out the effort. Only the writer can answer that.

Aside from marketing what advantages are there?

To answer that let me point to my books. Of all my books I’ve written, only one has not been turned into a series and that was Dead Eye Will. Why didn’t I make it into a series? Primarily I wasn’t interested. But I have considered rewriting the story and then turning it into a series, but at the moment I have other stories demanding attention.

But a series has advantages, such as:

  • I, the writer, can connect my thoughts from one book to another
  • There is continuity for the reader
  • Research is still there, but not nearly as much
  • Author has already laid out the location, time period, and customs
  • It makes writing easier

In Part 2 we will explore this further.

For information on TR Writing Services (“we edit, proof, and publish the book within you”)  contact us at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com. Our Free booklet tells you about our services. And we are upfront on our prices (all are low).

VISIT MY AUTHOR’S PAGE TODAY: amazon.com/author/rfrederickriddle.

ARE YOU A BOOK REVIEWER? I am always looking for book reviews for R. Frederick Riddle and Tess Riddle books. I value your reviews.

If you would like to review our books contact me at marketing@tr-indbkstore.com with the subject line indicating that desire. An example of an appropriate subject line would be: ‘Seek to review [book Title].’ In the email make sure to indicate your email address, your name, and the choice of copy (PDF or Epub).

 – – – – – – –

R Frederick Riddle is the Editor of TR Writing Services providing help to struggling and/or new authors to write and publish their books. In addition, he is best known for Christian Historical and Speculative Fiction. He is also co-founder and Vice President of T&R Independent Books where his books are featured. To reply to any blog you have the option of commenting on a blog and/or sending an email to marketing@tr-indbkstore.com. You may also be interested in his Facebook page at RFrederickRiddlesWorld.

A Look At World That Was

As you know I recently published my newest novel World of Shem. Since this is book 3 of my series World That Was I thought it appropriate to take a look at the series.

World That Was is a series of books covering the Book of Genesis. While each book is strongly based on the Scriptures, I have not only added my imagination but have spent hours upon hours of research regarding such things as geography, foods, clothing, and more. Below is a summary of books both published and planned.

PERISHED

This first book of the series begins with Creation, the Garden of Eden, the Expulsion and the early lives of Adam and Eve. From those early days it continues onward until the day the Flood overtakes the world.

Readers have expressed glowing comments about this novel, such as “the author brings the Bible alive!”

WORLD OF NOAH AND THE ARK

This is the second book of the series. I wrote this because there is so much confusion about the Ark, especially coming from Hollywood. Therefore I not only depicted Noah and his family but I shined the light upon the construction of the Ark itself.

But I didn’t stop there. As an added bonus to my readers I added a Q&A section at the back of the book that is worth the book’s price all by itself. Here I answer some of the misleading claims of people who believe the Ark is nothing but fantasy. These claims include the geography of the old world as well as details regarding the construction of the Ark and its floatability.

WORLD OF SHEM

Book 3 of the series covers the Flood, time on the ocean, landing on Ararat, the sin of Ham, the Tower of Babel, the Confusion of Tongues and beyond. The book continues until Abram (Abraham) is in Haran.

WORLD OF ABRAHAM

Book 4 will cover Abraham’s life from Haran into Canaan and beyond. This novel explores his travels, his love for God, his inconsistencies, his nephew Lot and what happened to him, and more. The reader gets a close up view and understanding of Abraham and Sarah.

WORLD OF JACOB

Book 5 will cover a little of Isaac but will be focused upon Jacob and his adventures. This novel will also begin taking a look at his sons.

WORLD OF JOSEPH

Book 6 will be the story of Joseph. Here the reader will see the byplay of jealousy as it is played out by his brothers. Joseph himself has a few problems that the Bible hints at and must be addressed before he fulfills God’s plan.

As you can see I have a full load ahead for me. But I am looking forward to it. Writing these novels is far more than an exercise in imagination. Much research has already taken place and more will be required. While time consuming and tiring, it is well worth the effort.

Let me leave you with this principle: Research lends credibility to your work. No matter the genre, no matter the length of the novel, and no matter your skill level, research provides the basis for a good, credible story.

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R Frederick Riddle is the author of several books and is best known for Christian Historical Fiction. For more information on him or his books visit his Amazon Authors Page. He is also co-founder and Vice President of T&R Independent Books where his books are featured. To reply to any blog you have the option of commenting on a blog and/or sending an email to marketing@tr-indbkstore.com. You may also be interested in his Facebook page at RFrederickRiddlesWorld.

 

The World That Was: Adam

We have been looking at how I wrote The World That Was series. Today I will take a look at character development as it relates to Adam.

You might wonder what could possibly be difficult about creating the character Adam? After all, he is the primary character, other than God, in the first four chapters of Genesis. What’s so difficult?

It was difficult for the very reason that Adam is so well known. Anybody who has read those first four chapters has formed in their mind an image of what he was like. And the Bible gives insights. My task therefore required me to be very careful to make his personality fit what the Bible describes and hints at.

First, here are some basic facts found in the Bible:

1.     Adam was created from earth (clay?) by God
2.     Adam was the first human
3.     God gave him great intelligence (his offspring invented music, worked with brass (mining & industrial processes), established religion and more
4.     God placed him in the Garden of Eden
5.     God gave him a wife
6.     God fellowshipped with them morning & night (cool of day)
7.     Adam sinned
8.     Adam was expelled from the Garden
9.     Adam believed and worshipped God
10. Adam fathered at least three sons and possible three or more daughters

These are ten basic facts. You can discover more by studying the Bible. It provides a general insight into the man. But I needed more.

So how did I do it?

The first thing was to become familiar with his story as it is related in the Bible. Being something of a Bible student that wasn’t hard. I also needed to be aware of his unique relationship with God plus his life with Eve in and out of the Garden.

That last point provided me the spark my imagination needed. What was the Garden like? I did a lot of research on gardens, but eventually I settled on the fact that this was not like some backyard garden. It probably was more like the Amazon.

It was a perfect world that Adam found himself within. And when God created Eve, he had a perfect wife! This was all before sin corrupted us, so such perfection can not be found today. (I love my wife dearly, but she has a sin nature just like me, so that rules out perfection. Although she comes close.)

As I studied these questions I was able to put Adam in differing situations. This required me to step inside the man and become him. Then it was, As Adam how do I react to the Garden? What fascinates me? How do I relate to Woman (Eve)? These questions triggered my imagination.

More difficult than that was Adam’s relationship with God, his Creator. As Adam how did I view God? As Creator? As my Friend? Myriad possibilities. Added to that I had to be very careful about God Himself.

In writing about God I followed a very simple principle: Not to have God do anything or say anything that was not found elsewhere in the Bible. That was tough, but I believe I held to that principle successfully. Thus, the God of my novel was consistent with the God of the Bible.

Actually that principle is good for writing about any well-known historical figure. But it was an absolute must regarding God.

Back to Adam. Another principle I employed was: put myself in his shoes (so to speak). I referred to that above. But it is important enough to go deeper. When writing about your characters, especially your primary character, it is a big plus if you can become that character.

For example, I needed to put myself in Adam’s character and imagine my reaction to the first sin. That wasn’t impossible since I know how I feel whenever I sin; it is terrible guilt! With Adam it would have been magnified! And then there was the expulsion! The Garden of Eden was his home, the only home he had known. How did he feel and how did he react to being cast out?

Identifying with Adam enabled me to demonstrate his sorrow, his strength to handle the murder of Abel, and the building of “Little Eden.” This last was my imagination let loose. If I had been Adam I would have felt tremendous guilt, but I also would have remember the wonderful days in Eden. And I wouldn’t want to forget it! Thus, when I built my first home, and everyone thereafter, I would have built within the house a small place (perhaps a courtyard) where I could meditate and remember God. I might even call it “Little Eden.”

Once I had the character of Adam clearly embedded in my mind, I was able to trace out his history as the years went by and he faced different scenarios, virtually all for the first time.

All in all it was quite a humbling and satisfying experience. I used two very important principles:

1.     Not to have God do anything or say anything that was not found elsewhere in the Bible.

2.     Put myself in my character’s shoes.

I believe that your imagination is the most valuable tool a writer possesses. If you can put yourself within your character and express the result to your readers, you have the beginning of a successful story.

Imagination is something we emphasize in Authors Academy. While having an imagination is something you have or don’t (and if you don’t you are in the wrong business), but we can give you principles for employing it.

Your comments are welcome. Just go to my Facebook page and leave a comment about this article.

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R. Frederick Riddle is the author of several books. For more information on him visit his Amazon Authors Page. He is also co-founder and Vice President of T&R Independent Books where his books are featured.

The World That Was: Using Science

Last issue we looked at the supercontinent Rodinia. In this blog I will discuss science and how I used it.

First of all when discussing science you must decide which of the three viewpoints of science to which you adhere.

  1. True Science
  2. Evolutionary Science
  3. Creation Science

 Many of you might say that you adhere to true science. Unfortunately, that is impossible. True science, you see, is not really a viewpoint (yes, I tricked you). True science is the raw scientific data that exists in our knowledge base. It must be interpreted and interpretation rests upon viewpoint or theory.

Evolutionary science is a theory that believes that man evolved over millions and billions of years and interprets true scientific facts accordingly. At one point it held the day but today more and more scientists are questioning its validity.

Creation science is a theory that interprets true scientific facts according to its belief. It believes that a Higher Being, Who we Christians and Jews call God, created the world and man. There was a day that Creation science held the day, but then Evolutionary science came along and people thought it was better and more intelligent. But now the pendulum is swinging back to Creation as an increasing number of scientists are returning to a Creationist viewpoint.

I am a Christian who accepts the Creationist theory as the correct theory. Which brings us to today’s topic. Most writers don’t have to worry about such things, but when writing Biblically based stories it is a must.

Why?

Because the Bible record of events is at odds with evolution. It is true that people often twist the Bible to mean anything they want, which is why it is important to always read “in context.” When you read it that way it removes a lot of silliness.

So how did I use science? Being a Creationist I chose sources that I had complete confidence in having their facts straight. Two of these are Institute for Creation Research (ICR) and Answers in Genesis (AiG). There are others, of course, but those are in my opinion the best.

When writing the story of Creation itself I found these resources to be highly accurate and informative. I was able to draw out the knowledge I needed to undergird my book Perished: The World That Was. Not only for Creation, but also regarding the earth itself (see Rodinia) and the Flood (see Historical Perspective).

Science is a useful tool. Once you know which theory you embrace you can start researching your novel. Now, I will say this: If you embrace evolution you will have a very difficult time writing a Bible based novel or non-fiction book. Evolution simply doesn’t work well with the Bible. And, unfortunately for you, there is no middle ground such as Theistic evolution (a belief that is largely discounted by Evolutionists and Creationists).

So settle that in your mind. That is your starting point.

Actually when writing about Biblical events and people you will find you are using both the historical and the scientific resources at your disposal. I did. My primary was, and is, the Holy Bible. I rely on the King James Version because its history traces all the way back to the beginning (another subject) while other versions have broken histories and are suspect in their accuracy.

The best way that I have found to understand the science of Creation and other Biblical events is to:

1.     Let the Bible first interpret itself.

2.     Then use science to help understand.

Always use the Bible first. If you use science first and then try to fit the Bible within its realm, you will have problems. God gives us wisdom (science) to help understand not contradict His Word.

If you follow that simple rule you will do fine. You have no reason for hesitating at using science. It is a tool that can enrich your writing when done properly.

Will you be criticized? Perhaps. But such criticism will more often come from either non-Christians or Christians who don’t really believe that the Bible is inspired. (How can you know you are saved if you don’t believe the Bible is the Inspired Word of God? How do you know that Jesus really said you must be born again?)

Now be forewarned. When researching science there is a lot of information available. And it can get boring. So you will have to dig deep and persevere. You will learn more than you will ever need to put in your story, but you may need it to understand how best to use the information.

Remember this truism: Scientific and Historical data need to be accurate in your story, but they should not be the primary thing.

If you write science fiction novels the science will play a much bigger role. But in writing Bible based novels, the Biblical story is paramount.

What if you are writing a novel not based on the Bible? You still want your science and historical data to be accurate. All sorts of people will read your novel. Some of these may have a deep understanding of science, or of a particular historical era. You make a mistake and they will see it.

So how did I use science in regards to the Ark? First it required a lot of research. For Perished I used the latest scientific knowledge then available. Currently I am writing a Special Edition book about the Ark. There is much more information available. Back when writing Perished there were theories abounding about the Flood and the Ark, but now there has been more scientific discoveries both about the worldwide Flood and the possible construction of the Ark.

I have investigated these new facts and have used them where appropriate. As stated above, I learn more than I ever use. But that gives us another principle: New discoveries are always being made, so you need to keep in touch with the facts even after you have published your book.

Why?

Because you may some day write another book that would need the same facts or you may rewrite the book you just published. Your readers will be current so you should be also.

If you liked this blog visit our Facebook page, like it and post a comment.

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R. Frederick Riddle is the author of several books. For more information on him visit his Amazon Authors Page. He is also co-founder and Vice President of T&R Independent Books where his books are featured. Authors Academy offers training in writing, publishing, and marketing.

The World That Was: Historical Perspective

Last Wednesday I blogged about an Introduction to The World That Was. Today is the second in the series of blogs devoted to this subject. Last time I discussed how I got the title and subtitle of the first book of the series.

 Today I want to discuss the historical perspective.

 When the idea came to write my first novel, Refuge: The Genesis Record, it came as a result of a Bible study I was doing. And some of the facts recorded in the book came directly from the Bible. But since the Bible was written to instruct us about man’s relationship to God there were only some basic facts given, such as the blue print God gave Noah of the Ark.

 I was immediately faced with a problem. This world we live in now isn’t really interested in the Flood or pre-Flood history. Go backwards a couple hundred years and the interest would have been much higher allowing for a writer to easily discover facts and theories pertaining to the pre-Flood world.

 So I had a problem: How do I discover a factual basis, in addition to the Bible, to lay a strong foundation for a book? You might wonder why that would be necessary given I was writing fiction. My response is easy: I believe that the more facts the writer can discover, the richer his/her novel will be.

 The Pre-Flood World

 I love history. Period! So it is not surprising that I looked to history for the answers. And I discovered an amazing fact. A sophisticated society grew up within 500 years after the Ark landed on Mt. Ararat! While 500 years sounds like a lot of time in our personal worlds, from a historical point of view it is a very brief time.

 So I had discovered a perplexing situation. Although historical records of the pre-Flood era were gone except for the Biblical record, this 500 year miraculous rising of a sophisticated society demanded my attention. I quickly realized that the only way for such rapid development was if the people had carried over the flood a library, if you will, of knowledge.

 With that perspective in mind, the pre-Flood world was suddenly opened up. I could study the post-Flood world, combine it with the Biblical record, and arrive at a plausible, perhaps accurate, view of life before the Flood.

 Another factor that influenced me was the genius factor. As I read the Bible it was quite apparent that Adam and Eve were very intelligent. Scientists say we only use maybe 10% of our brain power. But if God created them perfect in all their ways (certainly implied in chapters one and two of Genesis) then they probably used a much higher percent of their brain power. We would probably call them geniuses if they were alive today.

 So I now that a perspective on Adam and Eve as two highly intelligent individuals who produced children and descendents who were also intelligent. I also had a window into their world to see what they had accomplished in 1656 years. And I had a Biblical account that highlighted some of the achievements.

 Now it only took a few minutes for me to describe the process involved, but it took days, weeks, and months of research to put it all together. You may never face the problem I first faced, but whatever genre you write in it will be necessary to do research. Some times it will be easy and at other times you may need to really dig for that nugget of information.

 The process for me was very rewarding. I learned more than I could ever include in my book. In addition, I was able to create a vibrant world that was believable and consistent with the Biblical record. Plus the characters were not merely one dimensional but were well rounded with strengths and weaknesses.

 So what am I saying? Basically this: Be willing to do the hard research. You may run into a wall, but don’t let that stop you. If the obvious research isn’t productive, think outside the box. What other ways can you discover the information?

 Was this interesting? Helpful?

 Feel free to comment.

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Frederick Riddle is the author of several books. For more information on him visit his Amazon Authors Page. He is also co-founder and Vice President of T&R Independent Books where his books are featured.

Vacation: Opportunity to Research Book

The idea for this blog came as my wife and I have been planning a vacation. Usually when we think of vacation it is fun and relaxation, but when we think of researching a book it is hard work.

 While on the face of it the two are not compatible, they can actually work together. One of the things most vacationers like to do is take pictures, both still and video. And one of the tools used for research is pictures. And there you have the connection.

Almost any genre can be researched when on a vacation. Here in the south there are many vacation spots where we could research geography, history or simply the local flavor of a town. Come to think about it, that’s not just the south, it is anywhere.

 For example, one of our favorite vacations was St. Augustine, Florida. This city is loaded with history and geography. The city claims to be the oldest city in America, has a 17th century fort, founded by Ponce De Leon, and so much more history. Plus lots of geography.

 When visiting a place like that you want to take a lot of pictures. Not to be filed away in a closet, but as potential story lines or at least background material. And you do this while having a good time!

 I don’t know if one of us will some day write a story that takes place in St. Augustine, but we could.

 Another source is brochures. These are usually packed with information that can tickle your imagination. Plus, there is the experience itself of walking the streets, visiting the various historical buildings, and seeing the city.

 All of these take place on a vacation and are potential research material for future stories.

 But, you say, I’m not planning t write on the place we’re going to vacation at. Doesn’t matter. You might change your mind, in which case if you took the pictures and picked up the brochures you have a gold mine of information.

 Or you might use the material for some other real or imaginary place!

 The simplicity is amazing! You actually do research while enjoying yourself. Instead of hours on the computer you see, feel, and smell the facts that may be just the nugget that fires up your imagination!

 So use your vacation as a research tool.


For more information on writing visit T&R Academy.